Pendragon Grand Campaign

XIV. Preparations were made for the march northward...
Wherein the knights ready themselves and their families for the possible changes to come.

The Story So Far

Early Spring, 490

Before Pentecost Court even arrived, knights across Logres attended to their personal affairs. There was no need to wait on formal announcements. A battle was coming, one whose bloodletting would be astounding even in these vicious days. Women were loved, children given one last lesson, swords sharpened, and land surveyed, all of it with a thought that never again would these things be done. Death was almost assured. What mattered then was victory.

It is said that Octa craved Excalibur as a magical trinket for his brother, something to match the Saxon king’s magical axe. Little could Octa have known that his own weapon was likewise sought after. For the last six years, the Centurion King has fought a desperate holding action against the Saxons in Malahaut. Now he sits in Eburacum, a prisoner in his own kingdom. With the certainty of a sunrise, all of Logres expects Octa to move his horde south.

Uther is determined to meet him. After years of maneuvering, the pieces are in place. The northern lands are reinforced. The western kingdoms are placated. Plunder from the continent funds additional levies. Duke Gorlois and his Cornish knights have finally rallied to the king’s banners. With Excalibur as a shining beacon, Uther Pendragon rides north to contest his Saxon foe.


Player Characters
Sir Gildas, Sir Marcus, Sir Pedivere


Weekly Recap

Sir Dagonet’s Jest (Funniest Moment)

Paul – Speculating on Sir Henry’s subconscious state of worry at sensing the presence of an intoxicated Sir Marcus hovering over his defenseless form.

Bryant – the look on paul’s face when I made a succeseful flirt roll to whore (ed. note: I don’t recall making a face at all, so it must have been that much funnier and authentic).

Incursion of the Fae (Eeriest Moment)

Paul – Sir Marcus’ reaction to finding the corpses in the forest.

Bryant – no arguments there but it have have been a few seconds earlier when the bodies where origuinally discovered

Sir Dalan’s Charge (Best Heroics)

Paul – A tie between Sir Marcus for honoring his duty to the Earl, Sir Gildas for being prepared to enforce the Earl’s justice if Sir Marcus tried to take matters into his own hands, and Sir Pedivere for joining the Quest for the Axe.

Bryant – sir gidlas for offering his entire house of knights to aid in the search

Hunting for Glatisant (Dubious Decision)

Paul – Sir Pedivere’s handling of Sir Elad’s papers. Not saying if he is right or wrong in his approach, but that if he is wrong, it could be considered dubious.

Bryant – the bandits for picking the wrong caravan to raid

A Dream of Camelot (Best Roleplay Moment)

Paul – Sir Marcus’ meditation on regret, vengeance, and mercy during the trial. Possibly Bryant’s finest roleplaying moment of all-time.

Bryant – there a moment early on that set the stage for the quality of night it was. Marcus, Gildas and Pediveire spoke of the saxon King and getting the Axe to save the soul of sir henry and the visit Sir Gildas received from Sir Pellinore.

Wily in Wylie (Luck of the Irish Award)

Paul – Umm…obviously the twelve thieves, eleven of whom now have a fighting chance for life and one who escaped a potentially worse fate than mere execution.

Bryant – the main thief because if he had met a younger version of Sir Marcus would have undoubtedly suffered a fate far worse than death

Curse of the Creamers (Luck of the Polish Award)

Paul – Sir Marcus learned some lessons about duty and responsibility the hard way.

Bryant – Marcus’s wench and poor daughter. if they just waited eventually marcus would have gone to them

Honoring Those Who Honor Us (Pat on the Group Back)

Paul – Loved the roleplaying tonight, and always enjoy these opportunities to get different characters to spend time together that might not otherwise. In this case, the emotionally wounded Christian Sir Pedivere met up with the apprehensive pagan Sir Gildas and the turbulent pagan Sir Marcus. It made for some interesting conversation and circumstances.

Bryant – A very good session setting up a very somber pentecost court


Family Legends

Sir Gildas
Sir Gildas felt an immense sense of duty to help out Sir Marcus in his quest, but was disturbed when he saw how much the tragic conclusion had changed Marcus’ attitude regarding justice.

Sir Marcus
All our actions have consequences even the ones we think can be left alone or gotten to in due time. Sir Marcus learned this lesson the hard way losing a daughter a guilt that will stay with him for the rest of his days. The killers were brought o justice but even so Marcus knew there was an emptiness inside of him. On that very night he went and met his son for the first time so he would never have to feel the emptiness again.

Sir Pedivere
Pedivere found it strange that the bloodthirsty Pagan showed the quality of mercy more forcefully than the former monk had in recent years. The entire affair disquieted Sir Pedivere and left him ill at ease.

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XIII. Tribute was given and retribution was demanded...
Wherein the pecking order of the realm is explored in full.

The Story So Far

Spring, 489

The carts of Clatford Manor were returned to Silchester, but instead of stolen loot, they were filled with Silchester dead. The road through Chute Forest had become a killing ground as Earl Roderick’s pointed counterstrike became as brutal a blow to Silchester as Sir Keith’s mailed fist to Lady Clatford’s face. When Duke Ulfius returned from Gaul, Sir Blains was there on the docks to meet him. Word quickly spread at how wroth the duke was at the news.

King Uther was otherwise oblivious to these events, as he remained in the west and continued to hold court for the nobility of western Logres and the kings of Cambria. In Gaul, Prince Madoc met with victory in Bayeaux. However, after the city had been thoroughly plundered, he turned around and commanded the army back to Britain in what seemed a pre-ordained decision. Praetor Syagrius was abandoned with his own force, which bravely continued on. Early rumors from the continent claim that the Praetor was soundly defeated and his own fate unknown.

In Salisbury, Earl Roderick, Sir Gildas, and Sir Marcus returned to find the remaining knights full of sanguine contentment. The tribute was delivered, minus a pair of chargers. The Earl did not seem as pleased as the other knights would have thought, and he retreated to take counsel with his advisors. The Earl had an inkling of what would be coming at that year’s Pentecost Court, and his suspicions would be proven true.


Player Characters
Sir Finnian, Sir Keith, Sir Kendrick, Sir Marcus Scipio, Sir Pedivere


Weekly Recap

Sir Dagonet’s Jest (Funniest Moment)

Paul – When I mentioned that a knight wasn’t one that Marcus Scipio recognized, Jeff chimed in that it must therefore be Prince Madoc.

Tom – The prospect of Sir Marcus the Roman marrying Bronwyn Worboys and becoming Sir Kendrick’s new dad.

Incursion of the Fae (Eeriest Moment)

Paul – Sir Finnian hearing Lord Grately’s squire’s scream and then rushing into the tent to see the sight of the dying lord.

Tom – King Uther’s and Duke Gorlois’ pre-battle parley.

Sir Dalan’s Charge (Best Heroics)

Paul – Sir Pedivere and Sir Finnian who stepped in to intercept a would-be Silchester assassin, only to find Sir Keith’s friend Sir Christopher of Lindsey.

Tom – Earl Roderick, for standing up to Duke Ulfius.

Hunting for Glatisant (Dubious Decision)

Paul – Agreeing to let the “not particularly in his right mind these days” Pedivere investigate this visitor inquiring after Sir Keith.

Tom – Sir Marcus Brodrig’s decision to toast a great victory with fetid swamp water.

A Dream of Camelot (Best Roleplay Moment)

Paul – Sir Marcus Scipio deftly helping his new friend Sir Ashe of Clarence save face when he was being shown up in front of his wife by two rude knights.

Tom – Sir Finnian’s recounting of Lord Grately’s final moments.

Wily in Wylie (Luck of the Irish Award)

Paul – Salisbury’s misfortune (losing Grately) is Sir Keith’s gain as it opens up an opportunity for the Earl to stick it to Blains and Unflius by marrying Lady Adwen to the heir of Cholderton.

Tom – Sir Finnian, for marrying an industrious eldest daughter of a rich vassal knight.

Curse of the Creamers (Luck of the Polish Award)

Paul – Lord Grately, who was slated to die only to have Sir Finnian show up most unexpectedly and have a fighting chance to save him…which poor Sir Finnian fumbled away.

Tom – That sorry mother fucker with the magic axe. He just doesn’t know it yet.

Honoring Those Who Honor Us (Pat on the Group Back)

Paul – A solid group dynamic helped energize a quiet year event-wise.

Tom – Who knew that the Armenians had such good chow?


Family Legends

Sir Finnian
Recent events had Finnian realizing just how lucky he was to be ensconced in the bosom of the county, as distant from the treacherous border intrigues as he could be. Yet even as he thought it, he remembered his fallen uncle and realized that these machinations still managed to affect him.

Sir Keith
Keith spent many weeks in the Chute Wood with his men memorizing every track and game trail so that there would be no way for raiders from Silchester to catch them unaware.

Sir Kendrick
The Summer of 490 would bring either death or redemption to Sir Kendrick; of that he was certain. He had sworn as much to Merlin, and nothing less could repay his debts to Sir Henry and to Squire Aaron. With three healthy sons, Sir Kendrick’s line was reasonably secure, and despite the meteoric rise he had envisioned a scant five years ago, perhaps he was to be more like his grandfather than any other ancestor.

Sir Marcus Scipio
Lady Indeg was not getting any younger and, try as he might, Sir Marcus the Roman wasn’t getting any more legendary. Something would have to give soon.

Sir Pedivere
Proof that no good vengeance goes unpunished in a corrupt reign.

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XII. Tales were told: one woven by words, the other writ in flame...
Wherein Silchester and Salisbury fight whilst King Uther presses his claim.

The Story So Far

Summer, 488

Clatford was a fiery ruin, obscuring the distant dust cloud which marked the beginning of Levcomagus’ response. Following the king’s road, the Salisbury knights fled southwestward as quickly as the could, escorting the carts which contained their loot. Earl Roderick had demanded that Clatford burn and its treasures taken. A group of forty knights, ably commanded by Sir Keith, delivered on their Earl’s wishes.

It was a bold plan, audaciously conceived by Sir Keith, his peers, and a slew of family knights. Clatford, already weakened from last year’s events and depleted to aid in Prince Madoc’s campaign, was easily taken and quickly plundered. The knights managed to push through Monxton by mere threat and were pulling up on Salisbury-loyal Grately, knowing that whatever pursuit had been mustered was surely gaining ground.

Meanwhile, in the west, King Uther arrived at Wells, beginning his diplomatic campaign of bringing more of his lords in line while also gaining the support and allegiance of other kingdoms. With him went Earl Roderick, and with the Earl, Sir Marcus and Sir Gildas. The three of them traveled in silence, all of them aware of what the King was not (yet): Salisbury and Silchester were in open conflict.


Player Characters
Sir Finnian, Sir Gildas, Sir Keith, Sir Kendrick, Sir Marcus, Sir Marcus Scipio, Sir Pedivere


Weekly Recap

Sir Dagonet’s Jest (Funniest Moment)

Paul – Sir Marcus Scipio responding to accusations of Sir Keith’s bashing about Lady Clatford: “That was an accident, I think.”

Gabe – I did deliver on that one, but I will nominate Tom’s channeling the outrage of the knight who came under a flag of truce when he got my desparate/insulting counter-offer.

Incursion of the Fae (Eeriest Moment)

Paul – When botched navigating rolls meant that the water leapers all attacked Sir Marcus’ boat at once! Thankfully, their proverbial bark was worse than their literal bite.

Gabe – Burning corpses on the log-and-pitch fortification.

Sir Dalan’s Charge (Best Heroics)

Paul – Sir Marcus and Sir Bar holding their own against the water leapers for a few rounds!

Gabe – Bernard the peasant holding his position at the log-and-pitch fortification in the face of a charging knights on horseback.

Hunting for Glatisant (Dubious Decision)

Paul – The wanton slaughter of so many Silchester knights.

Gabe – Splitting one’s forces is always a risky proposition. Sometimes it pays off (ask R. E. Lee) and sometimes it does not (ask G. A. Custer). In this case, splitting the force to attack the enemy’s rear did pay off.

A Dream of Camelot (Best Roleplay Moment)

Paul – Sir Gildas storming into the king’s tent to demand the boon of hunting the water leapers!

Gabe – Sir Creamer making his roll not to get “vengful” with the arrogant knight who came under a flag of truce.

Wily in Wylie (Luck of the Irish Award)

Paul – Sir Marcus, because the leapers were much less imposing than I thought they would be.

Gabe – Sir Creamer then making rolls for “battle” and inspired “love-of-family” enhancements, and getting to decapitate same said knight in fair combat.

Leap of the Macsuls (Luck of the Polish Award)

Paul – The knights of Silchester strove to do their duty and met with a bitter, brutal end in Chute Forest.

Gabe – Bernard the peasant died at his post.

Honoring Those Who Honor Us (Pat on the Group Back)

Paul – Thanks, Tom, for running the skermish and thanks to Jeff for being prepared to run it if Tom couldn’t make it! Oh, and thank Gabe for the Jose Marquez memorial tribute!

Gabe – Here’s to the enjoyment of food and drink in a convivial setting. Thanks to those who host, those who bring, and those who partake, for all are needed to create such moments in the brief flicker that is a human lifetime.


Family Legends

Sir Finnian
During Christmas in Wylie, Sir Finnian was overheard to have said of his uncle Alec, “Don’t think of it as losing an uncle. Think of it as having gained much Silchester loot!”

Sir Gildas
After failing to kill the most water leapers during his encounter in the marsh, Sir Gildas resolved himself to obtain a wife and child. He failed at that task as well. It was a long winter.

Sir Keith
Clatford? Nay, it was at the Skirmish of Grately where Keith slew the 40 knights of Silchester. I hear he cleaved the head clean off Sir Rutherford in combat for insulting fair Diantha. Looked for him in the battle he did. Met with swords and struck the most terrible blow. I hear the head sailed through the air, helmet and all. What a sight that must have been!

Sir Kendrick
The Skirmish of Grately felt much like Madoc’s naval raids to Sir Kendrick. Though he participated in the fight, it felt as though he was also controlling the combatants like pieces on a board.

Sir Marcus
I…DO…NOTLIKEBOATS!

Sir Marcus Scipio
REUTERS (London — June 2015):
Knights’ “Mass Grave” Found at Hospital Building Excavation.
[excerpt] Professor Cooper of Cambridge’s Archeology Department was among the first experts to survey the site. “This appears to have been the aftermath of a battle with high casualties, and it is not unsual for combatants to be found buried in a collective grave under such circumstances. However, the condition of the remains suggests an especially violent fight. Not only decapitations and dismembered limbs, but teeth, bones and remnants of armor scorched at high temperature by fire. In the Western World, effective flame weapons were virtually unkown in that epoch, at least outside of a siege or naval context, so determining what this signifies will require substantial further evaluation.”

Sir Pedivere
And now, you must bring us… a shrubbery! — Pedivere’s wife.

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XI. The Earl decreed blood for blood, and his knights made it so...
Wherein retribution most terrible is visited upon Silchester.

The Story So Far

Early Summer, 488

Sir Gordon pulled into the Earl’s personal retinue. Sir Pedivere wounded in both body and mind. Sir Henry in a kind of hell, neither truly living nor dead. In a year’s time, childhood friendships and youthful exuberance had been torn asunder. What was left were men in dark times – knights who must rise to the challenge of a troubled and tragic world.

King Uther rode west to treat with his vassals there, as well as the kings of Cambria. With him went Sir Marcus and Sir Gildas, along with many knights of the realm. South sailed Prince Madoc with a great host, there to deliver Soissons from the heathen occupation of the Franks. Praetor Syagrius went with a lightness of heart, merrily anticipating fighting alongside his good friend Sir Marcus Scipio, not at all aware that this was one expectation of many which would not be met.

Marcus the Roman had sided with his fellow knights in eschewing the opportunity for plunder and good Christian cause to stay in Britain. It was after that decision was made that the Earl secretly assembled them and made them aware of his ultimate purpose: to leave a contingent of knights behind to bring sword and flame to the lands of Sir Blains. What happened to Lady Diantha was too great an insult and the time for retribution had come. Sir Keith and Sir Pedivere most especially looked forward to bloodshed.

As the various forces split apart to go their separate ways, plans fell into place. Deep in the woods near Baverstock, though, oaths were spoken of a most binding sort. The future had taken root in the past.


Player Characters
Sir Finnian, Sir Keith, Sir Kendrick, Sir Marcus Scipio, Sir Pedivere


Weekly Recap

Sir Dagonet’s Jest (Funniest Moment)

Paul – I suppose the part where I was so into character as the elder knights that I started dispensing advice that helped them thwart GM Paul’s plans.

Jeff – Sir Marcus Scipio being held at bay by a footman with some weapon yanked off the walls until Paul could return and rule him dead by fiat.

Incursion of the Fae (Eeriest Moment)

Paul – Sir Kendrick leaving the group to go deal with the town and its possible dangers without other PC input.

Jeff – Nothing terribly eerie, but the predawn ride out of the forests into unknown dangers is as close as we seem to get…

Sir Dalan’s Charge (Best Heroics)

Paul – Sir Marcus Scipio, Sir Keith, and Sir Pedivere being first into the manor to deal with whatever dangers lay within.

Jeff – I’m going to say Kendrick, and whatever he did. There was nothing terribly heroic in the manor, and he did manage to nobly best four men without injury to himself or his foes.

Hunting for Glatisant (Dubious Decision)

Paul – Not taking any hostages is possibly a dubious decision.

Jeff – Sir Creamer, our leader and self-appointed humanitarian, firmly planting a mailed fist in the poor Widow’s face.

A Dream of Camelot (Best Roleplay Moment)

Paul – Sir Keith laying out Lady Clatford and the reactions afterwards. A nice illustration of your increasingly divergent worldviews.

Jeff – The planning of the mission, in all its inglorious details and uncertainties.

Wily in Wylie (Luck of the Irish Award)

Paul – All of you for putting together a solid enough plan…with some divine intervention ahem…which got you into Clatford and out ahead of the sizeable response.

Jeff – The Irishman deserves this…heading out on a raid and he didn’t even need to bring a sword for all the fighting he faced.

Leap of the Macsuls (Luck of the Polish Award)

Paul – Poor Bill seemed like he was about ready to keel over most of the night. Hope he’s feeling better today.

Jeff – This one is awarded directly to Duke Ulfius of Silchester. May he now learn the folly of leaving one’s lands completely unprotected after thumbing the Creamer wolf in the nose.

Honoring Those Who Honor Us (Pat on the Group Back)

Paul – A rousing escape, but as Princess Leia says in Star Wars, it’s not over yet.

Jeff – We successfully planned and executed a raid without flaw despite stiff resistance from one minor.


Family Legends

Sir Finnian
One of the unique pleasures of being an Irishman in England is having the occasion to watch the inhabitants of that larger island burn each others homes to the ground. While Finnian was sad not to have had a greater part in the festivities than shooing away the odd peasant from such a noble activities, he would gladly do so again in furtherance of this becoming an annual tradition.

T’would warm the hearts of his cousins and their descendants for generation, so it would.

Sir Keith
Sir Keith slew 40 knights from Silchester that night and looted gold and the like to keep lamb shanks on the tables of even the meanest Cholderton folk.

Sir Kendrick
It was good that Silchester equipped its noble knights from ye olde Brown Bear armoury. Not good for Silchester, mind you, but good nonetheless.

Sir Marcus Scipio
BRITISH MUSEUM
CATALOG ITEM # 313687

Mace Head, Iron
Sub-Roman era, c. 450
Engraving: “MSGC * Silchester * DLXXXVIII * ad mortem festinamus peccare desistamus”

Sir Pedivere
488 was the summer Sir Pedivere learned that emotions and the inability to love thy neighbor brought him to the depravity of a mere bandit.

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X. Old friends gathered together, yet nothing was as it once had been...
Wherein our heroes contemplate their own mortality.

The Story So Far

Spring, 488

If ever a decade had been cursed with misery, surely it must be this one. So thought the denizens of Earl Roderick’s domain. It started with the Saxon invasion of Salisbury, its midway point was bathed in the calamity of Eburacum and the Pyrrhic victory of Mount Damen, and now Prince Madoc’s naval campaign brought home as many corpses and broken men as it did chests full of plunder.

It was a Christmas without an Earl, as worries over Saxon retaliation prompted the Earl to stay with the King’s court (and with him his retinue). Manors and keeps girded themselves for Saxon raids, but in the end they did not come. Perhaps the Saxons were as gorged on their dead as the good people of Logres. Now Sir Hywel leads a Salisbury contingent to Winchester to reclaim their liege and to reunite old friends and brothers-in-arms…though there will be many empty chairs present to first speak what heavy hearts cannot.

For all the losses suffered, the leadership of Logres is in high spirits. Prince Madoc’s campaign is considered a great success and King Uther considers his efforts in the north a satisfactory start. Nor is it all bad news for the knights of Salisbury. House Fournier welcomed a heir, at least for as long as Sir Pedivere holds the title of Lord of Tisbury. The rescued Lady Diantha gave birth to twin boys: Amig and Pedivere. It is said that Sir Renfrew sought to name one of the children Marcus, but Diantha refused, claiming the right belonged only to her avenger.

There are tales to be told, truths to be revealed, and secrets to be exchanged. As the knights of Salisbury draw closer to Pentecost Court, the time for these things is near.


Player Characters
Sir Finnian, Sir Gildas, Sir Keith, Sir Kendrick, Sir Marcus, Sir Marcus Scipio, Sir Pedivere


Weekly Recap

Sir Dagonet’s Jest (Funniest Moment)

Paul – Bryant’s ill-timed playing of his “Hail to the King” text tone (right as the Earl had wrapped up an important speech) followed by Tom acting in character as if Sir Marcus had just said that aloud.

Jon – Which was all on the heels of Marcus Scipio a&nnouncing to court that his loyalty is to the king, seemingly oblivious to his obligations to his earl.

Incursion of the Fae (Eeriest Moment)

Paul – The meeting with Merlin.

Jon – The party wondering aloud if we were somewhere secure while essentially discussing treason.

Sir Dalan’s Charge (Best Heroics)

Paul – The pact to save Sir Henry.

Jon – Marcus Scipio for seeking to engage Merlin in conversation.

Hunting for Glatisant (Dubious Decision)

Paul – Sir Marcus Scipio assuring his good friend and savior, Praetor Syagrius, that he would fight with him on the continent.

Jon – Marcus Scipio asking the Earl if it would be too forward for him to request a personal exemption. Sir Elad responded for the earl, “Yes, it would be too forward.”

A Dream of Camelot (Best Roleplay Moment)

Paul – I quite enjoyed the telling of the Adventure of the Creamer Curse (and the audience feedback).

Jon – Marcus and Kendrick had a genuine reconciliation.

Wily in Wylie (Luck of the Irish Award)

Paul – Not lucky, per se, but Sir Marcus Scipio went into the evening expecting repudiation from his friends, but instead got thanks and commendation.

Jon – Keith for finally getting the orders to raid into Silchester.

Leap of the Macsuls (Luck of the Polish Award)

Paul – Sir Pedivere whose fearful personality is like good milk that has gone bad. Where will this new road take him? Also to Sir Gildas who recounted the tale of his own knighting when he too missed the Leap in spectacular fashion.

Jon – Marcus Scipio gained a lot of attention this week. He pissed off the earl, pissed off Elad, pissed off Amig, and promised Praetor Syagrius that he would help fight the franks.

Honoring Those Who Honor Us (Pat on the Group Back)

Paul – Absolutely worth the wait. I loved the telling of tales and the introduction of a new character onto the scene.

Jon – The entire session was one giant best roleplay moment. So glad we were able to achieve what this game’s potential is.


Family Legends

Sir Finnian
Sir Finnian could never explain properly why he took the oath without thought or question. The best he could say is that it felt like the right thing to do in the moment. Whether it was is something that time and his own actions would bear out.

Sir Gildas
Sir Gildas learned that while true bravery has its costs, it also has a way of multiplying. Sir Henry’s brave acts paid dividends in the bravery of his peers, as evidenced by their willingness to complete Merlin’s quest.

Sir Keith
The dogs from Silchester finally went too far with their scheme to kidnap Diantha. The earl decided it was time to respond to Silchester with action.

Sir Kendrick
A quest! A chance to redeem the failure at the Battle of the Wash, and with it, a chance to save an old friend’s life. Though he knew not when the axe of which Merlin spoke would reveal itself, Sir Kendrick could think of no better way to begin than to make it known to Duke Ulfias that Salisbury would stand no longer abide Silchester’s transgressions.

Sir Marcus
There is always hope. Friendships mended, family friends rescued, the birth of twins. A pact was made to save the soul of friend. I will not fail him again.

Sir Marcus Scipio
“Heavenly Father, spare this noble soul that he may find a destiny worthy of his virtue, his courage, his fidelity. Let Merlin work your will through his mastery of the unseen and mysterious forces of your creation. Let my dear brother in arms be restored by faith, that he may be exalted in faith. Please, may he rise again, like Lazarus, with his prodigious strength renewed, and his eyes opened to the power and the love of the One True Lord in Heaven.”

Sir Pedivere
Are you truly insane if everyone else agrees with you?

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IX. Where the king's fleet sailed, Saxon ships burned...
Wherein Uther gains leverage through both diplomacy and war.

The Story So Far

Summer, 487

Uncertainty reigned with more certainty in Logres than the king himself. So it was that in 487, Uther Pendragon set forth tasks to regain advantage. With Excalibur as his symbol of rule, he set forth with a small contingent to Lincoln, there to bring the fractious Duke Lindsey into line. With him went Earl Roderick and with the Earl went Sir Keith.

Setting forth too was the King’s Fleet, newly refurbished but still under the capable command of Admiral Gwenwynwyn. Sir Gordon and Sir Marcus Scipio were assigned to garrison duty. Sir Henry and Sir Finnian signed up for the naval action immediately. Sir Pedivere had planned on remaining in Salisbury, there to lead an expedition for his sister-in-law Diantha, while Sir Kendrick and Sir Marcus planned to join the Earl’s entourage. However, a late-arriving summons from Prince Madoc singled out the three of them and summoned them to the naval campaign.

All of Logres waits restlessly, for the king ordered all lands provisioned and locked down. No one has forgotten the savage retribution of the Saxons in the wake of the Battle of Frisia. In the north, the king waits on his embassies and demands homage. In the south, his fleets sail and his knights bleed for his cause. In the heart of his lands, families pin their hopes of those brave knights left there to protect them in their hour of need.


Player Characters
Sir Finnian, Sir Henry, Sir Kendrick, Sir Marcus, Sir Marcus Scipio, Sir Pedivere


Weekly Recap

Sir Dagonet’s Jest (Funniest Moment)

Paul – The knights’ embarrassed discomfort as poor Sir Marcus Scipio was publicly dressed down by Sir Amig.

Bryant – Pedivere becoming melancholy not once but twice. The aftermath, not so funny.

Incursion of the Fae (Eeriest Moment)

Paul – Desperately trying to establish who had the magic potion with Sir Henry’s life on the line.

Bryant – Realizing how much damage the blow the saxon beserker actually did to Sir Henry

Sir Dalan’s Charge (Best Heroics)

Paul – Sir Pedivere throwing his own safety to the wind to continue fighting in the naval campaign.

Bryant – no arguments but also dubious

Hunting for Glatisant (Dubious Decision)

Paul – Sir Marcus Scipio used subterfuge instead of a direct approach in his investigations. However it might have turned out, he ended up being second-guessed and upbraided by his superior for it.

Bryant – Sir Pedivere wanting to engage in battle knowing that even the smallest amount of damage could have been disastrous

A Dream of Camelot (Best Roleplay Moment)

Paul – Despite Sir Renfrew being on death’s door, Sir Marcus Scipio used a gentle line of communication and inquiry to get needed facts.

Bryant – There were a couple, The two that stuck out were Henry, Pedivere and the admiral talking about Pedivere staying in reserve and prior to that Pedivere and Marcus being yelled at by Prince Madoc

Wily in Wylie (Luck of the Irish Award)

Paul – Sir Henry for the GM asking a question of Pendragon’s creator yesterday, reading the answer this morning, and then have a perfect scenario regarding that question drop into his lap tonight (along with the necessary in-game item around to justify it).

Bryant – whoever didn’t participate in the naval missions

Leap of the Macsuls (Luck of the Polish Award)

Paul – Sir Marcus Scipio got the help he needed…and probably regrets that it ever arrived.

Bryant – Henry, Pedivere, Marcus & Kendrick for making shitty rolls/decisions at the wrong time

Honoring Those Who Honor Us (Pat on the Group Back)

Paul – Easily the most brutal and traumatizing session for our heroes. The aftershocks of this one will be felt for some time. I look forward to seeing how you roleplay the tale moving forward.

Bryant – Tom for stepping up to run the battles.


Family Legends

Sir Finnian
Finnian really must have the luck of the Irish. He was the only one who didn’t go mad or end up on death’s door.

Sir Henry
Sir Henry’s bravery and courage were tested in the final battle, where he was knocked unconcious and fell into a coma. His companions tried reviving him with a magic potion, but it had no immediate effects.

Sir Kendrick
When Sir Kendrick could think of no way to spin the year’s events in a light favorable to him, his lamentations were heard throughout Shrewton. His thoughts rested melancholy for months upon end with the memory of his noble squire Aaron, half-brother of Sir Marcus Brodrig, who died defending the two knights during their petty squabble. Sir Kendrick had sworn to teach Squire Aaron the right path to knighthood, and by his sacrifice and death Aaron had proven his teacher a failure.

Sir Marcus
What Have I done? I swore to bring them back safe and instead made a giant mess. Never again will my focus be swayed from the true threat. By trying to bring one comrade to his senses I not only pushed him further away I have caused damage that can perhaps never be mended. Even worse because of this a brother died and a comrade was crippled. My Failure. I blame myself, but even more than that I blame Madoc!

Sir Marcus Scipio
Remind me, brother, never to use clever commoners as proxies, because they are too clever by half. I encountered a band of abductors that deceived me handily. They deceived me so well that they put me off until a larger host joined me, and, in pursuit, we did not catch up with them until they were within a hen’s flight of their master’s gate. If they were less cunning, I might well have been provoked to route them in the woods where I first found them. What a glorious slaying would have been lost then!

No, do not use clever commoners, if you can help it, for any sensitive purpose. Put your primary reliance on the dullard nobility, in war and in peace and in all things in between.

With a Heavy Heart,
Your Brother,
Marcus

Sir Pedivere
War is Hell? In the family retellings, the nature of the squire reciting the history of Pedivere Fournier (as all who squire under the Fournier Coat of Arms must recite the entire family history) at this point comes plain — do they decry Sir Pedivere’s abandonment of conflict as unbecoming of a knight, or do they recognize within him the precursor of a greater chivalry whose seeds had yet to sprout?

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VIII. With Excalibur came the hope of peace and unity...
Wherein more worldly matters await our heroes.

The Story So Far

Spring, 487

Excalibur! The name echoes throughout the land, as did tales of the knights who aided Merlin in bringing it back. All were agreed that Sir Pedivere, the priestly knight, was one. So too were Keith of Cholderton and Kendrick of Shrewton. There was general concurrence that both Marcus the Roman and Marcus the Little Giant were there, though no one could quite agree on who did what. Other names were sometimes in the mix – Finnian, Gordon, Henry – though one didn’t have to cast a stone too far to find a relative behind the inclusion. They all stepped forward to aid the magician, though as to why things happened they can say…those were questions for kings and sages.

After aiding Merlin in retrieving Excalibur and receiving kudos for the deed at Christmas Court (in an event now known as the Great Sword Feast), the knights find themselves in unexpected higher standing. They are thrust into events far greater than their own provincial worldview, for Logres is in dire need of heroic actions. This new Saxon menace from the continent, under Aethelwith, runs roughshod over the north, undeterred even by the success of Prince Madoc’s raids or Sir Brastius’ stabilizing influence. How can King Uther expect to defeat his foes when even his own vassals sit safely in their keeps and ignore his calls? With the Sword of Power in hand, the King means to change the fortunes of the land starting this year of our Lord 487.


Player Characters
Sir Finnian, Sir Henry, Sir Keith, Sir Kendrick, Sir Marcus, Sir Pedivere


Weekly Recap

Sir Dagonet’s Jest (Funniest Moment)

Paul – Lady Indeg putting Sir Marcus on the spot with a sly inquiry about the specifics of Sir Marcus’ heroics in aiding Merlin gain Excalibur. Sir Marcus to his credit didn’t lie, though he wasn’t entirely forthright , either.

Bill – A tie between Jon’s reaction to hearing that Diantha Fournier had gone missing and Sir Kenndrick’s declaration of “Loot the ships, then burn them,” as he watched the sailors trying to take provisions from the already burning Saxon ships.

Incursion of the Fae (Eeriest Moment)

Paul – The disappearance of Diantha Fournier, sister of Keith and sister-in-law of Pedivere.

Bill – The 75% losses to the knights unit in the first engagement in an otherwise very single sided battle for the Brittons lends a credence to their suspicions of being made canon fodder.

Sir Dalan’s Charge (Best Heroics)

Paul – Sir Pedivere forcefully ensuring that Diantha was searched for by petitioning Earl Roderick through Sir Elad.

Bill – Agreed.

Hunting for Glatisant (Dubious Decision)

Paul – Sir Marcus choosing to court two of the county’s most notable ladies was certainly eyebrow-raising.

Bill – Sir Pedivere’s decision to try a special combat manouver his first time leading a battle. How was he to know that such manouvers don’t work as well in the sand and surf of the beach.

A Dream of Camelot (Best Roleplay Moment)

Paul – Keith and Kendrick had a good discussion in private about various intrigues.

Bill – The complaining of Sir Pedivere, Sir Marcus, and Sir Kendrick after being shanghaid by Prince Madoc was entertaining.

Wily in Wylie (Luck of the Irish Award)

Paul – Sir Marcus scored a critical success on his flirting roll, turning what would have been a harsh putdown from Lady Elaine into an unexpectedly fruitful first conversation.

Bill – Sir Kendrick gained a kind wife and first born son to be proud of.

Leap of the Macsuls (Luck of the Polish Award)

Paul – Sir Kendrick, Sir Marcus, and Sir Pedivere had an unexpected change of plans thrust upon them by Prince Madoc.

Bill – Sir Pedivere who only made one decent battle roll and otherwise did everything he could to put our unit at a disadvantage.

Honoring Those Who Honor Us (Pat on the Group Back)

Paul – Very exciting to see the group split up for the first time, introducing new dynamics into the storyline going forward!

Bill – While we are still taking a bit of time looking up rules, this second time through the winter court was much faster.


Family Legends

Sir Finnian
With Sir Finnian at its head, the fortunes of the Mullally family rest a great deal on chance. But chance smiles on Sir Finnian now and he knows that some day it might not as it has not on all his neighbors. So, in what small ways as he can and they will accept, he aids his neighbors in preparing for a saxon assult. Though this year has brought his sword to Saxon shores, in his heart Finnian knows it is the defenses of hearth, home, and the lands of his liege that are his true place.

Sir Henry
Sir Henry valiantly proclaimed his support for the campaign against the Saxons. His display of courage on the field of battle emboldened his fellow warriors despite the tactical and strategic mis-management at the hands of Sir Pedivere.

Sir Keith
Merlin himself gave Keith the first clue to unraveling the mystery of the Creamer disappearances.

Sir Kendrick
A son! To Sir Kendrick and his wife Wynne was born the heir to the Worboys line, and they named him Geralt. On the day of his birth, he was baptized before the broken blade of Lexbellator in the name of God the father, the Son and the Holy Spirit, and in the days of feasting that followed, it was rumored that the child was so pious, he would not suckle on days of penance until after sunset.

Sir Marcus
Sir Marcus was not happy about being stuck on a boat. He went from successfully beginning to woo the county to being hand-picked for a dangerous campaign, seemingly not for reasons of respect. Looking at his colleague Sir Pedivere, Sir Marcus is determined to get everyone back in one piece. Twenty-five years ago, his grandfather dies. Fifty years ago, his great-grandfather died. Sir Marcus is determined not to follow in that particular legacy.

Sir Marcus Scipio
On garrison duty I have naught to fear
So long as I hold mine trusty spear.

Sir Pedivere

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VII. As the knights accompanied Merlin, the forest shimmered strangely around them...
Wherein fantastical adventure follows in the magician's wake.

The Story So Far

Late Spring, 486

Our heroes began their first full year as knights with some significant events. Sir Henry became husband and father. Sir Pedivere married Elaine, the Maid of Tisbury. Sir Marcus, too, became a father, though he did not know it yet.

At King Uther’s Pentecost Court, the mood was dour after the defeat at Colchester and indecisive clash at Mearcred Creek. The news of the moment was the fall of Soissons, the last outpost of Roman control in western Europe, and the presence of Praetor Syagrius. The Praetor had come petitioning the king for aid in retaking Soissons and it seems the king is seriously entertaining the possibility. A fraternal moment happened when Sir Marcus Scipio agreed to host the Praetor during the latter’s effort to recruit good Christian men for the endeavor.

Prince Madoc approached the knights suggesting that history repeat itself – that like their fathers before them, they undermine Saxon power through a series of daring raids. Most of the knights approved of the idea, but Sir Pedivere caused a scandal when he brusquely refused the prince’s offer to his face. In Salisbury, when it came time for their assigned duties, the knights were surprised to find themselves assigned to garrison duty instead of Prince Madoc’s raiding party. Sir Kendrick’s attempt to petition Earl Roderick through Sir Leo was firmly rebuffed.

Whilst on patrol near Tisbury, the knights encountered an old goatherd who asked for their aid in retrieving his prize animal. Sure enough, they espied a goat of unusual size high up on a hill. Pedivere, suspicious of never hearing of this goat or goatherd before, remained behind while the others investigated. Following the goat into the woods on the other side of the ill, the knights stumbled upon a small giant which immediately took to battle against them, uprooting a tree for use as a weapon! After a fierce combat which saw Sir Marcus terribly wounded by a boulder, the end came when Sir Marcus Scipio felled the giant with his spear.

Sir Pedivere found himself suddenly watching the proceedings with a clapping, cheering goatherd who then changed his appearance into that of Merlin the magician! Merlin healed Sir Marcus with a mere touch and whispered words, while beckoning the knights to follow him into the forest. Apart from Sir Pedivere, still cautious and mindful of his duties to his family, the other knights embraced this unexpected opportunity for adventure and glory.


Player Characters
Sir Finnian, Sir Gordon, Sir Henry, Sir Keith, Sir Kendrick, Sir Marcus, Sir Marcus Scipio, Sir Pedivere


Weekly Recap

Sir Dagonet’s Jest (Funniest Moment)

Paul – Tom’s fearful concern that Jeff might get a fire going right as we were starting a court sequence.

Gabe – Marcus the Whorechaser falling on top of a nearly-dead Marcus the Roman to make a pile of Marcus-fail.

Incursion of the Fae (Eeriest Moment)

Paul – The reveal of the nukalavee as it charged at them, sprouted arms, and attacked!

Gabe — Water gushing from the nukalavee’s wounds.

Sir Dalan’s Charge (Best Heroics)

Paul – The four knights who stood against the nukalavee and protected Merlin from it.

Gabe – Pedivere conspicuously refusing to join court’s applause for a warlord king in the dark ages.

Hunting for Glatisant (Dubious Decision)

Paul – Sir Keith’s insistence on not speaking the whole truth about what was witnessed was certainly eyebrow-raising. Did the events of the Sword Feast vindicate him? That’s up to each knight to decide for himself.

Gabe – Kendrick using “grapple” against a four-armed enemy on horseback. Dubious — not ridiculous or even foolish — but dubious in the dictionary sense.

A Dream of Camelot (Best Roleplay Moment)

Paul – I enjoyed the debate between Kendrick and Keith about who would ride to Sarum to brief Earl Roderick, particularly when Keith came right out and called out Kendrick on the latter’s tendency to boast.

Gabe – Kendrick’s recounting of the adventure, and misadventure, with Merlin.

Wily in Wylie (Luck of the Irish Award)

Paul – Sir Marcus Scipio, who ended up 1 point away from death. That one point makes a difference!

Gabe – Sir Marcus Scipio, who avoided passing out drunk at a Christmas party with the King in attendance.

Leap of the Macsuls (Luck of the Polish Award)

Paul – The three knights who were lost in the mystical forest and lost their part in the story, as well as Sir Marcus whose presence was fumbling comic relief.

Gabe – Sir Keith, who had his marriage prospects dashed by the unjust suspicions of a status-conscious potential father-in-law.

Honoring Those Who Honor Us (Pat on the Group Back)

Paul – An important session that will define the legacies of all eight families. Some excellent roleplaying and one near-death experience. A great way to start the last stretch of sessions in 2012.

Gabe – No one starting trouble at the Christmas party, despite ample opportunities.


Family Legends

Sir Finnian
Sir Finnian could not figure out why he was unable to make the journey through the trees. He could only conclude that the fae (or perhaps Merlin himself) have something against the Irish.

Sir Gordon
Ever the huntsman, Sir Gordon knows the value of being the hunter instead of the hunted. While not one to shy from combat when it is upon him, the dread tale of the nukalavee and the near-death of his friend Marcus Scipio prompted Sir Gordon to attend a few extra church services at Pitton.

Sir Henry
When asked why he didn’t make it through the forest with the others, it was remarked that this was the first time anyone could remember Sir Henry at a loss for words.

Sir Keith
Sir Keith wisely keep the secret of Excalibur from the people so that Merlin could reveal it in his own time. Keith made it his personal quest to see that Uther heeded Merlin and so he stayed near the sword and the king in order to guide the king to justice.

Sir Kendrick
In the instant that he beheld the Lady of the Lake entrust Excalibur to Merlin, something stirred deep within Sir Kendrick’s soul. Though he knew not what was to come, it was to be great, and having witnessed its beginning, Sir Kendrick resolved that it, above all other things, was worth fighting for.

Sir Marcus
During a moment of half-lucidity that night, Sir Marcus set down his tankard and explained in unnecessarily graphic detail the conditions upon which he would fornicate with a bear. The few who remained to hear the whole of the story concluded unanimously that Sir Marcus set the bar so unreasonably low, that he must have had an ulterior motive for stopping Sir Kendrick from administering the killing blow during the great hunt of 485.

Sir Marcus Scipio
As Marcus the Roman would later joke: “We were aghast that it had four arms, but relieved that it had but two swords.”

Sir Pedivere
Pedivere had no words for his experiences in 487, though he was certain they would come to him eventually, and when they did, those words would be…

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VI. While the king brooded, Prince Madoc seized the initiative...
Wherein our heroes enter their first full year of knighthood.

The Story So Far

Spring, 486

In early summmer, the knights answered the call of their liege. Some, like Sir Marcus Scipio, stayed behind to defend the county. The rest rode to Sarum – their wounds healed, their manors attended to and prepared for great migration of knights eastward. There in the capital of Salisbury was Uther Pendragon, King of Logres. He led his host east, through Hampsire, and into the Saxon kingdom of Sussex. Immediately upon entering Saxon lands, they were confronted by a force of equal size led by King Aelle.

A lengthy, but ultimately indecisive battle followed, as the knights’ mounted advantage and superior training were off-set by the sheer brutality of a Saxon force fighting in its home territory. Led by Sir Elad, the knights’ unit acquitted itself well against simple landsmen but were nearly routed off the battlefield by a force of heorthgeneats. Coupled with a loss to the Saxons in the north at the Battle of Colchester, Christmas Court that year was not particularly merry.

The remainder of the year saw a number of major events. Sir Henry got married to a common girl whose beauty has people whispering that she’s part fairie. They consummated their marriage with the birth of a baby girl. Sir Pedivere got married to a common girl as well – Elaine, the Maid of Tisbury – whose looks have people whispering that she’s part hag. Curious intrigues abounded with tales of a young pregnant girl showing up at Cholderton asking for Sir Keith along with stories that Sir Henry’s aunt-in-law was seen rustling horses. Idle, meaningless speculation, obviously.

As 486 dawns, people wonder…how will Logres respond to two years of setbacks against the Saxons? Prince Madoc, it seems, has a plan…


Player Characters
Sir Finnian, Sir Gordon, Sir Henry, Sir Keith, Sir Kendrick, Sir Marcus, Sir Marcus Scipio, Sir Pedivere


Weekly Recap

Sir Dagonet’s Jest (Funniest Moment)

Paul – Watching Gabe try to concentrate on the game while he was obviously being greatly affected by John’s chili.

Jeff – After overhearing some conversation comparing Merlin to an ornery bear coming out of hibernation, Pedivere wonders if it’s Merlin’s hide decorating the hearth at Shrewton.

Incursion of the Fae (Eeriest Moment)

Paul – The appearance of the disturbing three-eyed giant.

Jeff – Following a sorcerous Merlin into a faery-infested wood clearly takes the cake here. Didn’t he just try to kill us all?

Sir Dalan’s Charge (Best Heroics)

Paul – Sir Marcus choosing to attack when specifically targeted by the giant!

Jeff – Sir Kendrick’s heroic (and ultimately doomed) charge against a giant from upon a rouncy.

Hunting for Glatisant (Dubious Decision)

Paul – Riding up the hill was perhaps not the wisest idea, given both the initial goal and ultimate circumstances.

Jeff – Following Merlin to our certain deaths. You only cash in 10% of that Glory if you have male offspring.

A Dream of Camelot (Best Roleplay Moment)

Paul – I was hoping Marcus Scipio would seek out Praetor Syagrius, and I was quite pleased by the exchange between them.

Jeff – Kendrick’s honest and heartfelt efforts to avoid the dreaded garrison duty. Clearly, he is too craven to face the menace of being surrounded on all sided by palisades.

Wily in Wylie (Luck of the Irish Award)

Paul – Sir Kendrick whose rouncy took a blow that would have felled the honorable knight of House Worboys.

Jeff – Sir Marcus the Little Giant’s incredible ability to turn back time and avoid the opening two spine crushing blows from the giant with a deft use of rulesmanship.

Leap of the Macsuls (Luck of the Polish Award)

Paul – Sir Pedivere whose prudence found him ensorceled and out of a legendary combat.

Jeff – Sir Finnian, who fought an entire battle against a giant with such directed fervor he never realized his sword remained in its scabbard as he beat the giant mercilessly to no effect. Fortunately, the scabbard finally broke and the honor of the Irish was upheld when Finnian managed to draw blood. A wee bit, but it was blood!

Honoring Those Who Honor Us (Pat on the Group Back)

Paul – I really, really enjoyed seeing all of you there tonight. John, I hope you’ll think to join us more often. The session was greatly enriched by your presence. All in all, an excellent note to leave off on before the Thanksgiving break. See you in two weeks!

Jeff – Clearly, Ye Olde Grande Feaste which filled our hearts until bravery and friendship burst out of our ears. Special notice goes to John’s two chilis, Bryant’s fowls, and the Oreos Which May Never Be Served The Same Way Twice.


Family Legends

Sir Finnian
Do not doubt that there is much honor in garissoning the realm and protecting it from all threats, remember the day Sir Finnian and his fellow knights of Salisbury fought the giant. Many knights were sent to raid against the Saxons and some disappointed few remained behind to keep the lands at peace. Not a day’s ride from Sarum these knights fought and slew a mighty giant. This giant was so big he could uproot trees with his bare hands and throw boulders like they were pebbles. Who knows what devastation this giant could have caused if he was allowed to raid our more settled lands? The blood of man and beast was shed to bring that horror down. So remember, the honor of a knight is not just in carrying a sword or lance to smite the enemies of his lord but also in being a faithful and constant shield that protects all that his lord cherishes.

Sir Gordon
When the tale of the battle against the giant was told, Sir Gordon tactfully omitted the less-than-heroic image of riding forth to battle from the back of Sir Keith’s horse.

Sir Henry
After introducing his new wife to the King and his court, Henry rode off to serve on garrison duty. Along the way, he and his companions encountered a strange old man who asked them to retrieve a giant goat from up on the mountain. The goat lead them to the biggest three-eyed giant to ever live. Henry’s companions fought courageously, if a little ineffectively. Sir Henry dealt the most blows to the giant, tiring the beast out and wearing down his defenses. Eventually, a final piercing blow was dealt to the beast, and the curious old man stepped out of the woods to reveal himself to be the great magician Merlin.

Sir Keith
The people of Cholderton did love Sir Keith, but none had the nerve to inquire after his unrelenting hatred of goatherds.

Sir Kendrick
Later that year, Sir Kendrick’s uncles and cousins would ask what became of Trigger, his prized rouncy. Though the Worboys family was enthralled by the story of how he tilted at a giant, which struck out his horse from under him with an uprooted tree, fascination turned to disappointment when Sir Kendrick described how the goat-herder transformed into the legendary Merlin and the adventures that followed, for it had been hoped that knighthood would put an end to the tall tales he had spun as a youth.

Sir Marcus
Sir Marcus took a boulder in the face while Sir Marcus Scipio took the glory. All in all, the Roman had the better part of things. Still, Merlin healed all of Sir Marcus’ damage…so he’s got that going for him.

Sir Marcus Scipio
Looking down at the fallen giant, ashen in the pooling of its own blood, Marcus was unsure whether this had been more of a battle or a hunt.Was this a man? Less than man? More than man? The other Marcus had tried to speak to it, but who knows if this being had no language, or a merely a tongue different from our cohort? Verily, the giant struck first, so this was not murder. But it felt like something less than justice. None of the rightious heat Marcus had felt in his breast when trying to slay the bandits or the raiding knights abided there now. He was left with a cool, clammy uncertainty.

Sir Pedivere
Merlin appears and suddenly there are giant goat, ancient ruins, three eyed giants, and fantastical woods in Tisbury? What further proof is needed that Merlin cannot control the sorcerous and godless evil within him? A kingdom with him near its heart is a corrupt one indeed. It will never flourish!

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V. King Uther arrived with the summer, but did not tarry long...
Wherein the knights of Logres fight against the Saxons on two fronts.

The Story So Far

Summer, 485

The former squires enjoyed their first Pentecost Court as Vassal Knights, basking in the congratulations of the moment. They undertook their first apprentices the next day – squires from various families who would serve and aid them. After that, they departed with Sir Elad to return Sir Gordon to Pitton for rest and healing, and from there for a patrol of eastern Salisbury.

Whilst on patrol along the Bourne River, they were alerted to news of a Silchester raid ongoing in Allington. The knights girded for battle and rode forth, joined along the way by reinforcements from Boscone. At Allington, they took the field inconclusively against the villainous Sir Blains (though they did prevent the Silchester knights from escaping with the majority of their ill-gotten gains). Sir Henry in particular drew notice when he slew a knight of superior skill to his own.

After the skermish, the patrol shadowed the Silchester raiders north to Cholderton before they broke off and continued their patrol. Once completed, they returned to Sarum where they dispersed to their respective manors – their first time home as knights – to see to their lands and settlein advance oing Uther’s summer campaign.


Player Characters
Sir Finnian, Sir Gordon, Sir Henry, Sir Keith, Sir Kendrick, Sir Marcus, Sir Pedivere


Weekly Recap

Sir Dagonet’s Jest (Funniest Moment)

Paul – Zach and Tom singing “Berserker” in tandem made me laugh.

Tom – The scandalous rumors that Sir Henry’s aunt is a horse thief.

Incursion of the Fae (Eeriest Moment)

Paul – Not only was Sir Kendrick unhorsed and alone, he found himself facing when of the most deadly foes in the game: a Saxon berserker.

Tom – The double 20s on the base bad weather roll at Winter Court, before we came to our senses and decided to give it another go.

Sir Dalan’s Charge (Best Heroics)

Paul – Sir Kendrick survived alone on the battlefield and prevailed against a vastly superior foe.

Tom – I’m generally not keen on giving this award to an NPC, but Sir Elad’s consistently great Battle rolls were key. It’s because of him that we came out of that fight all but unscathed.

Hunting for Glatisant (Dubious Decision)

Paul – Had Sir Elad not elected to rally to him, I think Sir Kendrick was planning to stay on his own in the battle. That seems dubious to me.

Tom – It made sense to Sir Kendrick in his inspired state. I give the award to Sir Henry for electing to marry below his station…but soft! What light through yonder window breaks?

A Dream of Camelot (Best Roleplay Moment)

Paul – Pedivere’s frustrations over his life’s path manifest in every element of his knighthood. I liked how the whole idea of the battle repulsed him both morally and as a dose of self-pity.

Tom – This wasn’t a roleplaying-intensive session, but I’ll also give the nod to Sir Pedivere. He’s quickly becoming the most interesting character of this generation.

Wily in Wylie (Luck of the Irish Award)

Paul – Lady Gladys Macsul, whose wise husband invested in stewardship, thus allowing her to avoid the “mother and child die in childbirth” fate.

Tom – Sir Kendrick, because if he hadn’t scored a critical success on his Hatred: Saxons roll, that Saxon Berserker probably would have killed him.

Leap of the Macsuls (Luck of the Polish Award)

Paul – But then Lady Gladys gave birth to a girl, and Sir Henry took back everyone’s cigars in disgust.

Tom – Sir Pedivere, for marrying an ugly, boorish peasant woman. But take heart! She may yet bear him a son, then die.

Honoring Those Who Honor Us (Pat on the Group Back)

Paul – I really appreciated the team effort again, with special thanks to Jeff and Tom for the battle help, Jon and Bill for winter court, Zach for the extra computer/site access, and Jeff with some timely course corrections when we were jumping around in the rules!

Tom – It was great to have Bill around for this session – let’s see if we can get perfect attendance next week!


Family Legends

Sir Finnian
Sir Finnian broke with family tradition and went to war instead of garrison duty. Though Uther’s forces did not prevail, Finnian brought glory to his family for the might of his sword and the fierceness of his brethren brought much slaughter to the Saxons.

Sir Gordon
Often was the tale of Sir Gordon’s heroics in the Battle of Mearcred Creek told by the hearthfires in Pitton. What was omitted was that his one kill occurred when the sword slipped from his grasp and hurtled up into the air, skewering a poor Saxon peasant on its descent.

Sir Henry
Upon his return from battle (where he slew dozens of Saxon scum) Sir Henry chose a wife, Gladys. Naturally, she was the comeliest lass in all the land. Indeed, her beauty was matched only by the envy and petty jealousy of others, as absurd rumors were spread by those who could not get a wife themselves. Gladys was quickly with child, which she delivered with fierce determination and success. Again, jealousy lead to vicious rumors of the passing of both mother and child, but much like the Saxons who meet Sir Henry in battle, the rumors were quickly dealt a swift death.

Sir Keith
In the rough days of Uther’s rule Sir Keith became one of the realm’s first truly chivalrous knights.

Sir Kendrick
Unhorsed and separated from his unit, Sir Kendrick found himself surrounded by the godless Saxons. Suddenly, with an eerie hush, the horde parted, and he found himself only a few paces away from a giant. Nine feet tall and weighing two score stones, the brute smiled, and with a savage bellow, he charged Sir Kendrick as the Saxon throng joined in the din. A sharp silence returned to the battlefield as Sir Kendrick ran the behemoth through, and with a second swing of his blade, he separated the berserker’s head from his shoulders. As Sir Kendrick’s eyes smoldered with an ancestral memory of the Night of Long Knives, he surveyed his surroundings and saw the Saxons trampling each other to escape his reach.

Sir Marcus
When asked why Sir Marcus didn’t make a better account of himself in the battle, he was reputed to say, “A little giant means little heroics” before taking another swig from his bitter drought.

Sir Pedivere
From the personal correspondence of Father Tewi: "It was at this time Sir Pedivere confessed his terror of battle — not that he might fall, or be forced to take another’s life, for that was the duty he swore before God to undertake; but rather that there would come a lull in the battle where he was forced to consider all that he had done, and that he would be unable to see the next enemy through the tears he was shedding. While he may not have earned the nickname The Knight of the Rusted Gorget at this time, it was clear his essential nature was already formed.

It was also at this time he took Elaine Compton to wife, sealing the provenance of Tisbury manner. I am sad to say that he performed the duties due his wife in the same way he served as a knight — bound by duty and honor, and not love or a sense of family unity that so marked the Fournier clan. It is unsurprising that the lands quickly blossomed under the care of these two, for neither had anything else in their life that they loved.

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