Pendragon Grand Campaign

IV. Against his wishes, Sir Gordon was ordered to Pitton...
Wherein a patrol to the east is their first duty as knights.

The Story So Far

Spring, 485

On the way back from Vagon, the squires encountered bandits pillaging a farmhouse near Orcheston. They launched into battle and quickly subdued the scoundrels. At the same time, a force of knights from Shrewton (led by Sir Aldwyn) arrived to investigate. Sir Aldwyn saw Squire Marcus strike at a surrendering bandit. Aldwyn struck the squire roughly, reminding him that his duty in that moment was to deliver the prisoner to the Earl’s justice. Marcus said nothing but stared ruefully.

The remaining bandits were delivered into Sir Aldwyn’s care at Shrewton, who promised to take them to Sarum forthwith. The squires returned to Sir Elad and told them the story of what had transpired since they left. Sir Elad seemed pleased. Squire Kendrick made a gift of the pelt to Sir Elad, who promptly returned it to him as a gift back. At Sir Elad’s behest, the squires prepared to tell their tale to Earl Roderick and elected Squire Pedivere to do the honors. The next morning, the contingent from Vagon left for Sarum.

At Sarum, Earl Roderick and an assembled court listened eagerly to Squire Pedivere’s tale (cheering at points) and then in wonder at Squire Henry’s recounting of his meeting with the Questing Beast and King Pellinore of Gomoret (with the Earl gently warning Squire Henry against pursuing the creature). Squire Kendrick presented the bear pelt to great applause. That night, the Christian squires held vigil in the Cathedral of the Blessed Virgin Mary whilst the pagan knights celebrated raucously.

The next morning at the beginning of Pentecost Court, the squires were knighted and took the ceremonial leap! Their adventure as knights had begun! Their first duty was to escort Sir Gordon to his family manor of Pitton, where he was ordered by the Earl so that he would be healed in time for King Uther’s summer campaign against the Saxons. From there, they would patrol eastern Salisbury with their mentor, Sir Elad.


Player Characters
Sir Finnian, Sir Gordon, Sir Henry, Sir Keith, Sir Kendrick, Sir Marcus, Sir Marcus Scipio, Sir Pedivere


Weekly Recap

Sir Dagonet’s Jest (Funniest Moment)

Paul – Sir Marcus Scipio’s inaugural attempt at intrigue goes awry as rumors of the wild Sir Marcus end pointing at the wrong Marcus.

Jon – The random court encounters were terrifying and funny at the same time.

Incursion of the Fae (Eeriest Moment)

Paul – The moment as they came upon the Silchester knights, greater in number, and readied for battle.

Jon – Realizing we were charging the enemy and it was for real. Wondering if we would all be riding away.

Sir Dalan’s Charge (Best Heroics)

Paul – All of you took on a foe in superior numbers and strength, fighting them to a stalemate, but effectively winning as you deprived them of their ill-gotten loot.

Jon – Not hesitating to turn back the raiding knights from Silchester.

Hunting for Glatisant (Dubious Decision)

Paul – “Saxons!”, shouted Sir Marcus as he charged off toward the poor misidentified messenger so Marcus could decapitate him. Thankfully, Sir Elad’s command stayed Marcucs’ hand.

Jon – Marcus Scipio refusing an invitation to dance from an eligible lady.

A Dream of Camelot (Best Roleplay Moment)

Paul – Sir Keith’s conversation with Sir Hywel over the courtship of his daughter Jane.

Jon – I enjoyed how Paul had us play the court NPCs.

Wily in Wylie (Luck of the Irish Award)

Paul – All of the Salisbury knights for the wretched # of 20s that I rolled in opposing resolution.

Jon – Sir Kendrick narrowly avoided being burnt to death by a fireplace.

Leap of the Macsuls (Luck of the Polish Award)

Paul – Sir Marcus Scipio was socially cuckolded by his own rumor and during the skermish he lost his advantage when the knight he was fighting simply grabbed Marcus the Roman’s spear and wrenched it from him.

Jon – The poor wretches forced to squire us. At least they won’t be with us for long…

Honoring Those Who Honor Us (Pat on the Group Back)

Paul – The best teamwork wasn’t in the skermish but in the rulebooks. Great effort, all!

Jon – Everyone brought CANDY! Except for Gabe who brought organic snack mix.


Family Legends

Sir Finnian
Finnian joked that he learned the meaning of Christmas at Allington: it truly is better to give than receive.

Sir Gordon
Everyone gets to skermish and do battle. I get to sit on my ass at home. Yay.

Sir Henry
Other knights quailed at Silchester’s superior numbers, but rallied when Henry held aloft his lance in the air and said, “To Victory! For Roderick!” While other knights flailed about, lost in the flurry of combat, Sir Henry unhorsed his foe and then impaled straight through the ground. The Steward of Levocmagus blanched at the fury of Sir Henry’s attack and sounded the retreat. Thanks to Sir Henry, the battle was ended and Allington’s goods were saved.

Sir Keith
It was after the skirmish of Allington that Keith began contemplating a way to end the raids from Silchester for good.

Sir Kendrick
Though it came naturally to Sir Kendrick to slay brigands who preyed upon the weak, it came just as naturally for him to stay his hand against a Silchester knight who had engaged in the same conduct. Recognizing this, Sir Kendrick meditated at length about the nature of justice and whether God’s commandments applied equally to all men, or whether it was subject to one’s station.

Sir Marcus
“Is it true that you didn’t recognize the prince when he was talking to you?” That’s what many of his family asked Marcus. He freely admitted it was so, but shrugged it off, saying that he had a fine time at the feast and wouldn’t have changed anything. What bothered him far more were the inconclusive results of the skermish. Like an axe lopping off a head, Marcus likes his victory decisive. Still, he took the opportunity to praise Sir Elad – his father’s mentor and his own – who came to his aid in the thick of the fighting. With any luck, Sir Marcus would get his chance at revenge against Sir Blains.

Sir Marcus Scipio
Somehow the raider, himself just stumbling to his feet, gripped Marcus’s lance and pulled it away. Even as Marcus reached for his spear, the signal rung out, and the raiders made to retreat from whence they came. Marcus was seized with fury, and felt a lust for killing in his heart that, for an instant, welled over his entire being. Still dizzy with his own rage, Marcus overcame the urge to give chase, trotted his horse back to the rallying cohort, and told himself that God’s will had been done. By dint of fervent repetition, he came to believe it.

Sir Pedivere
“Father Tewi, you ask me to serve our Lord and the king by serving as a knight. What good can I do? All I have seen is the butchery of starving peasants driven to theft and more, and the worse depravity of well-fed knights who hunger for ever more. Worse, I find myself tempted by these evils. Why should I accept this burden? A knight is no blessed protector of the people. Instead, we are very much the enforcers of the whims of very fallible men.”

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III. The squires rode south toward Sarum and their destiny...
Wherein knighthood awaits for those squires worthy of the honor.

The Story So Far

Early Spring, 485

A joust was held for the right to lead the hunt, each round mightier than the last. At the end, Squire Henry of House Macsul stood tall, following up his triumph in the race with victory in the lists. The joust was great sport save for an unfortunate mishap with Squire Finnian’s lance shattered and splinters gravely wounded young Squire Gordon, leaving the latter unable to participate in the hunt.

That night, there was excited discussion of the day’s events and a high degree of tension as the Christians in the group reacted strongly to Squire Marcus’ pursuit of pagan wantonness. This culminated in a late-night confrontation between Squire Marcus and Squire Keith, who urged Marcus to not let his behavior ruin the fortunes of his fellow squires. Squire Marcus shrugged off the suggestion.

Under Squire Henry’s guidance, they set a course across Salisbury to the village of Imber where Sir Elad instructed Squire Henry to speak with Old Garr the priest. They rested briefly at Shrewton, home of House Worboys, and spoke with Sir Aldwyn. Once in Imber, Garr led them into the Blakemore Forest and set them on the hunt. The bear was found: a deranged, old, and mighty thing. Squires Kendrick and Marcus were first upon the scene (along with the hounds), and laid into the creature – both with their lances and then Marcus with his family’s great axe. When Squire Kendrick took out his sword to administer the killing blow, Marcus (hoping to discern the creature’s malady) attempted to block the stroke with his axe. They nearly came to calamitous battle, but Squire Keith rode up and beat down their blades with his own.

Meanwhile, the hunt leader, Squire Henry had a remarkable adventure of his own: stumbling upon Glatisant, the Questing Beast, and briefly talking with a knight hunting it…a knight who Old Garr later identified as being King Pellinore of Gomoret himself! That night, a great celebration was held in Imber. The claws were presented to Squire Marcus and the pelt to Squire Kendrick. The next morning, they began their return to Vagon but their thoughts were bent on Sarum and the knighthood which hopefully awaited them.


Player Characters
Squire Finnian, Squire Gordon, Squire Henry, Squire Keith, Squire Kendrick, Squire Marcus, Squire Marcus Scipio, Squire Pedivere


Weekly Recap

Sir Dagonet’s Jest (Funniest Moment)

Paul – As much as it pains me to say it, poor Henry’s keeping up the Macsul Leap tradition in gloriously ignoble style.

Zach – Ooof. Gotta agree with Paul here.

Incursion of the Fae (Eeriest Moment)

Paul – Squire Marcus being struck roughly by Sir Aldwyn.

Zach – Spotting the smoke in the distance. It could have been caused by anything! Bandits, dragons, an enemy army…

Sir Dalan’s Charge (Best Heroics)

Paul – Squire Pedivere charging the three bandits by the cart on his own. At the time, he wasn’t aware that they would be dumbfounded for the first round.

Zach – Squire Henry leading the charge into battle!

Hunting for Glatisant (Dubious Decision)

Paul – Squire Marcus Scipio dismounting and trudging through the field, arriving just in time for the end of the battle.

Zach – Hah! Agree with Paul, again.

A Dream of Camelot (Best Roleplay Moment)

Paul – Squire Pedivere and Squire Henry’s telling of tales to the Salisbury court.

Zach – Squire Brodrig chasing down the two bandits.

Wily in Wylie (Luck of the Irish Award)

Paul – Squire Pedivere made his Leap, took a blow which his armor absorbed all of, and defeated multiple foes. A reversal of fortune from the start of the adventure.

Zach – Pedivere came out on top of pretty much everything this session.

Leap of the Macsuls (Luck of the Polish Award)

Paul – For Sir Henry, a faceplant in the mud in front of Earl Roderick, Prince Madoc, his family, and assorted knights of the county.

Zach – In lieu of agreeing with Paul on nearly everything, the Leap of the Macsuls award goes to Squire Brodrig, who was unable to mete out his justice to the two fleeing bandits.

Honoring Those Who Honor Us (Pat on the Group Back)

Paul – My understanding from Jon is that I missed some excellent roleplay when you were deciding who would tell the tale to the Earl and how it would be told. Bravo to you for that sequence.

Zach – Congrats to everyone for for a great session. The attack on the bandits sequence was great fun!


Family Legends

Sir Finnian
When asked why he didn’t help his fellow squires out against the bandits, Finnian replied that he stayed with the other horses because he was nursing a terrible blister. For years after, the most popular jig in Wylie was a dance called “Finnian’s Blister”, which involved a great deal of nimble hopping on one foot.

Sir Gordon
Missed the battle, missed the glory, but at least I didn’t fall flat on my face in front of the Prince, the Earl, and every major family in Salisbury. So I’ve got that going for me.

Sir Henry
After departing from Imber, Sir Henry and his companions came upon a farmhouse being ransacked and pillaged by an army of bandits, while the farmer and his family were assaulted and defiled. Sir Henry valorously charged first into battle, defeating foes left and right, eventually granting mercy to the few left living from his daring display of swordsmanship. Upon arriving in Sarum, Henry was greeted by the cheers of the crowd, as news of his brave actions had traveled faster than his group. As Henry’s companions were playing children’s games with horses and jumping in puddles, he brought honor to his family name with his tale of battle, Glatisant, and victory. Indeed, the account of his journey was so intriguing that Earl Roderick begged Henry to recant it for all to hear.

Sir Keith
Boy, let it be necessity, not your desire, which slays the foe in a fight.

Sir Kendrick
By Divine Providence, the descendents of Vaddon the Holy came upon innocents beseiged by the lawless, and through force of arms was justice visited. That day, Squire Kendrick slew not one unrighteous man, but three, and following the example of his eldest uncle, he prayed for the souls of the departed, that they may have learned fear of the Lord in their final moments and that their sins may be forgiven. The following night, Squire Kendrick drew a cleansing bath, fasted, made confession and held vigil until dawn in the Cathedral of the Blessed Virgin Mary, for the following day, he swore fealty to Earl Roderick and was made a knight. In all this, Sir Kendrick reflected upon what was to be asked of him over the rest of his days, and he prayed that he may do what would be right in the sight of God.

Sir Marcus
I may have been blind with vengeance, but justice ought to be swift and mercy should be for those who show it. The looters were not merciful and were my hand not stayed, I would have (and started to) respond accordingly. Now that I am knighted, my true story will begin.

Sir Marcus Scipio
“Rush headlong. Swing wild. Then bragging and boisterous self-congratulation. Is there no place for prudence? For stoicism? For holding, by God’s teeth, a fighting formation?” Marcus was unsettled by his own resentments, but determined it best to keep his own counsel for the time being.

Sir Pedivere
Squire Pedivere’s Vigil was an uncomfortable stretch. He realized how different it was from praying together with his brothers in the abbey. There, each prayed to lift their silent voices in a joined chorus to the glory of the Lord. At the Vigil, those who even bothered to attend were focused solely on themselves and their future glory. In the beginning, Pedivere prayed that he would be strong enough to guide them along the proper path. As his focus faded, and his mind wandered in the early hours, he realized that this would not be his greatest challenge — far worse was his own slide into judgmental righteousness and his own subconscious thirst for selfish glory…

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II. Their first quest was a hunt in Blakemore Wood...
Wherein the squires joust for the right to lead the hunt.

The Story So Far

Early Spring, 485

The funeral of Sir Herlews was a grand affair, befitting a knight who had served his liege faithfully and honorably. Prince Madoc was in attendance and spoke most eloquently in tribute. A night of feasting followed. The squires became acquainted with Sir Pedivere Fournier, the second son and now reluctant head of House Fournier.

The next morning found the squires, including Pedivere, traveling with Sir Elad to Vagon for their final trials before being recommended for knighthood. In Vagon, the squires practiced with lance and sword, as well as entertaining a crowd with two horse races. Most notable were Squire Henry’s win in the first race (which left the crowd cheering) and Pedivere’s being thrown from his horse at the start of both heats (which left them whispering).

Afterwards, Sir Elad led them know that they had the opportunity to prove their valor before they even earned their spurs. Notice had arrived from Imber that the citizenry there was being threatened by a huge, man-eating bear. The squires will be in charge of the hunt! First, though, a joust to decide which squire will lead the others!


Player Characters
Squire Finnian, Squire Gordon, Squire Henry, Squire Keith, Squire Kendrick, Squire Marcus, Squire Marcus Scipio, Squire Pedivere


Weekly Recap

Sir Dagonet’s Jest (Funniest Moment)

Paul – Squire Henry’s suggestion that the only reason the bear pelt would be hanging in Cholderton is because he gifted it to Squire Keith.

Bill – Squire Marcus Scipio waking up the late rising squires with a clangor of “Saxons! Saxons!”

Incursion of the Fae (Eeriest Moment)

Paul – Squire Henry’s startling encounter with a creature of legend.

Bill – Agreed.

Sir Dalan’s Charge (Best Heroics)

Paul – Squire Kendrick and Squire Marcus’ fight against the bear!

Bill – The jousters all around.

Hunting for Glatisant (Dubious Decision)

Paul – Squire Henry feeling compelled to…hunt for Glatisant.

Bill – Squire Marcus trying to hault Squire Kendricks death blow on the bear.

A Dream of Camelot (Best Roleplay Moment)

Paul – Squire Keith’s upbraiding of Squire Marcus upon his return from carousing.

Bill – Agreed.

Wily in Wylie (Luck of the Irish Award)

Paul – Squire Gordon, whose wounds in the joust could have been so much worse.

Bill – Squire Kendrick, who narrowly excaped being mauled by a bear when the gods quibled over dice roling.

Curse of the Creamers (Luck of the Polish Award)

Paul – Squire Marcus Scipio never got off the starting line for the hunt but instead wandered aimlessly until stumbling upon a thunderstruck Squire Henry.

Bill – Squire Gordon, for being at just the wrong place at the wrong time in the joust.

Honoring Those Who Honor Us (Pat on the Group Back)

Paul – A good night all around figuring out the rules and the characters. This is setting a strong foundation for how you will interact through the years.

Bill – Once we started, everyone stayed in character when not looking up the rules. Very nice.


Family Legends

Squire Finnian
The joust to determine who would lead the hunt for a man eating bear was much anticipated by all the squires assembled, and many showed their valor that day. While perhaps not the most exciting match of the day, the bout between Squire Finnian and Squire Gordon certainly brought the loudest gasp to the crowd as in the first pass Squire Gordon was unseated and tumbled from his saddle unconscious and bloodied in a shower of lance splinters. Alas, Squire Henry foiled Squire Finnian’s quest for glory, again. Disappointed in his own loss, Squire Finnian could not sustain a dislike for the the affable and humble Squire Henry.

Squire Gordon
“Get on your horse and try again!” yelled the trainer at the crying squire. “Quit yer cryin’, boy, or do you want to end up like Gordon? First joust he participates in and it almost kills him. He didn’t get his shield up and it nearly cost him his life and plunged this family into chaos. That won’t happen again to another Korsak, not on my watch. Now get on your horse and remember…raise your shield!”

Squire Henry
Henry’s bravery and leadership were unmatched that day. He led his companions into the forest to hunt the mysterious man-eating bear, which, as it turned out, was nothing more than a feeble cub. However, Henry decided to leave the children’s games to his fellow squires, so he went to explore the forest. To his astonishment, he encountered the fabled questing beast Glatisant, pursued by King Pellinore. While the creature slipped from his grasp that day, he new his passion and bravery were equal to the task and vowed to capture it once and for all.

Squire Keith
With his family legacy hanging on by the thinnest of threads, Keith’s depression grew deeper as he realized that his fellow squires were teaching him what he didn’t want to do to be a great knight (along with the attendant rewards for being one). Most despairing of all was that he would always be associated with these squires and their actions would reflect on him as well. It was in these days that Squire Keith began asserting himself forcefully as a leader amongst his peers.

Squire Kendrick
Though the opportunity for valor was presented to all by the great hunt, only one could claim it. By the grace of God was Squire Kendrick given great talent and will, and through that grace he found and slew his quarry. His peers’ jealousy found expression in many ways, from verbal barbs to the edge of an axe, yet nobly did Squire Kendrick extend the olive branch to all. As the Lord causes the sun to rise on the evil and the good, and surely as He sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous, Squire Kendrick prayed for his comrades and forgave.

Squire Marcus
The pagan Marcus found constant reminders of how boring it is to live amongst Christians. Even his own nickname, The Little Giant, harkened back to his own family’s colorful, fae-charmed past. The Christians spent their times kneeling uncomfortably in front a quiet altar before a quest when they should have spent it as Marcus did: sharing his lust in a wanton celebration of life before a journey toward death.

Squire Marcus Scipio
He saw one squire meet his harlot.
He saw another catch sight of a mythical beast.
He saw the rest squabbling over the carcass of a hungry old bear that had grown too feeble to chase any prey swifter than a peasant.
He found nothing at all, and had nothing to show for the adventure.
Verily, he was the lucky one.

Squire Pedivere
God, we are not worthy to even be the merest peasant in your lordly realm, but guide us to be the best squires as we may be in this realm. Punish not squire Gordon for his inattentiveness, but let his injuries be a reminder to us all of the deadly earnest of the duties we must perform. And thank you for your great and generous blessing in allowing us to slay the Beastly Bear of Imber. Temper the fiery humors of Kendrick and Marcus so that they are well honed tools of your fury, instead of blood-lusting spawn of the Great Tempter. Finally, grant me the wisdom, courage, and valour of St. Joseph to endure this burden of duty I must bear.

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I. Our tale begins with a funeral...
Wherein the denizens of Salisbury gather to pay tribute to a fallen knight.

The Story So Far:

Early Spring, 485

In 484, King Uther led his army north to fight against a Saxon incursion, falling into a trap and defeat at Eburacum followed immediately by the audacious yet costly victory at Mount Damen. In Eburacum, Sir Reginald of Tisbury was slain and his father, Sir Herlews the Bullheaded, mortally wounded whilst defending the corpse of his son. Sir Herlews was borne back to Tisbury and miraculously lived through the winter.

Sir Herlews has died now, and the leadership of House Fournier and Tisbury falls to Pedivere, recalled from his training in the priesthood to once again pick up sword and shield in defense of the realm. Many knights and nobles of the land descend on Tisbury for Herlews’ funeral, and there are rumors that Uther himself will attend as Constantin did for Sir Dalan so many years ago. At the least, there are reports of a dragon banner flying alongside Earl Roderick’s standard.

Nearing Tisbury, we see a group of squires riding together. With the passing of Herlews and the costly victories in the north, their youthful dreams of glorious knighthood are now the grim realities of war and necessity.

Player Characters:
Squire Finnian, Squire Gordon, Squire Henry, Squire Keith, Squire Kendrick, Squire Marcus, Squire Marcus Scipio, Squire Pedivere

Weekly Recap:

Sir Dagonet’s Jest (Funniest Moment)

Paul – The 20s from Pedivere and Marcus Scipio in the opening round of the horse race…with their horses right next to each other no less.

Tom – Jeff’s election to wear his “One Number to Rule Them All” d20 shirt and being rewarded by six of his twelve rolls coming up 20. There is only one Lord of the d20, only one who can bend it to his will. And he shares fumbles.

Incursion of the Fae (Eeriest Moment)

Paul – The subtle but increased agitation of Squire Keith, leading to some serious backtalking of the patient, grizzled Sir Elad.

Tom – Squire Pedivere’s guesswork as to the supernatural beasts that might dwell in the forest. Well, it was eerie until we figured out he was just making stuff up.

Sir Dalan’s Charge (Best Heroics)

Paul – Squire Henry lives up to his reputation and confidently rides his horse to victory in the race.

Tom – I vote for whichever squire it was who got back on his horse to beat Squire Keith for the bronze medal. (Ed. note: Sir Gordon.)

Hunting for Glatisant (Dubious Decision)

Paul – Squire Kendrick attempting to hob-nob above his station could have backfired, but he successfully navigated the moment and managed to talk with Prince Madoc and Salisbury’s most notable nobles.

Tom – All of us for electing to get plastered the night before our final exams for knighthood. Of course, when I was 21 years old, I did some things that weren’t entirely dissimilar.

A Dream of Camelot (Best Roleplay Moment)

Paul – Marcus Scipio and Kendrick abandoning the race to help Pedivere, followed by the three of them determined to have their own race to atone.

Tom – Squire Pedivere receiving the mourners at his father’s funeral.

Wily in Wylie (Luck of the Irish Award)

Paul – Sir Henry did not fail a single roll that night, quietly distinguishing himself in the first part of the trials.

Tom – The man-eating bear in the forest, who will probably have the edge over mounted knights trying to hunt it with lances in dense woods.

Curse of the Creamers (Luck of the Polish Award)

Paul – The mourning Pedivere whose ill-omened life found him thrown from his warhorse twice in successive attempts. In pain and in grief, Pedivere is left no choice but to press on.

Tom – Seconded.

Honoring Those Who Honor Us (Pat on the Group Back)

Paul – Thanks for setting a great tone to start and looking forward to having the other players with us next week.

Tom – Excellent roleplaying all around. The augury for this campaign is good!

Family Legends:

Squire Finnian
Those who harbored a hatred for all things Irish slept poorly that night in Vagon, their minds filled with images of the smug sense of self-satisfaction on Squire Finnian’s face. Whether it was the lancing exercise or an admirable second place finish behind Squire Henry, Squire Finnian acquitted himself admirably and Sir Elad said as much.

Squire Gordon
A moment’s desperation failed as Gordon’s horse threw him to the ground. He could have given up, but Gordon was determined to finish honorably. Even as the other riders went by, he picked himself up out of the mud, mounted his horse, and with amazing horsemanship managed to overtake The Little Giant and dour Keith Creamer for third place, earning much praise from Sir Elad and appreciation from the crowd.

Squire Henry
Many came to see the race, for an unheard of four coursers were to be involved and on each courser a squire with horsemanship worthy enough to ride the beast. Of all those present, though, none was more favored than Squire Henry of Baverstock. Though the track was muddy and many other squires had misadventure, Squire Henry was as good as his reputation, riding surely and confidently to victory. He said little, save to offer kind words of thanks and concern for those squires wounded in the race.

Squire Keith
It was at the funeral for Sir Herlews that Squire Keith first witnessed the Glory of a true knight pass to an heir. Keith’s elation turned to dismay as it became clear Sir Pedivere was not desiring of his father’s legacy. A lesson for Keith to consider when thinking of the future and his own sons…

Squire Kendrick
As the last of the fathers enters the Kingdom of Heaven, so it falls to the sons to continue His work on Earth. Tears would be shed, but only briefly, for the glory of neither Lord, nor liege, nor lineage knows respite. Let the dead bury their dead, and I go announce the Kingdom of God.

Squire Marcus
Many were the pagan curses learned that day by the good Christian folk present at the squire trials. Sir Marcus of Laverstock, known as The Little Giant, had an ill-omened start to his day finding only pain at the “hands” of the quintain and being unceremoniously dumped into the mud by his horse when he tried to spur it to victory in the race. As befits his family motto, though, Marcus’ anger was a passing thing and he moved on quickly to the next opportunity to prove his valor and worth.

Squire Marcus Scipio
Squire Marcus the Roman remarked, many years(?) after that portentious day: “As I crossed the finish line, first in the second race, my sense was that Kendrick had the grace of God in his heart; that Pedivere had a curse upon his house, and that I had the confounding power of luck on my side. How our fortunes would twist and turn against one another could not be known at the time, but I realized that one’s fate was not one’s own alone; that, for good or ill, one’s own fate was sure to redound upon all those around him.”

Squire Pedivere
The origins of knights come from three sources in the literature. Many knights, such as Arthur, Lord of the Realm, are born into greatness. Most strive mightily for it, and a few like Sir Dalan are lucky enough to be remembered beyond their short years. Very few are of the final class — a great knight in spite of themselves and their efforts. Such is the tale of Sir Pedivere Fournier, the Warrior Priest of Salisbury. Despite his vocal protests and his sheer incompetence as a squire in the first few days, a clear-eyed and discerning Sir Elad insisted he continue his training, thereby ensuring the realm would have not only a potent warrior, but a man versed in the wisdom of the Lord during its formative age.

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It befell in the days of Uther Pendragon...
The campaign takes shape.

Ok, gents, time to begin the process of organizing and processing all this info. Programming is not my forte so anything you can do to help is appreciated. Suggestions are welcome. Please, as best you can, keep up your own character pages. When you can’t, let Bill or I know so that we can handle them for you.

Any time you think there should be a new Wiki entry, feel free to make it or request it.

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