Pendragon Grand Campaign

XXIV. The Saxons marched south, the Britons rode north, and there at St. Albans met...
Wherein a sickly King Uther takes the field against the Saxon menace.

The Story So Far

Winter, 495

Cambrian diplomacy netted little other than an expectation that their own infighting would keep the western borders quiet. Even that little comfort was secured not by diplomacy, but by one solid swing of Sir Marcus’ great axe. In the north, Octa and his forces – heavily bolstered by reinforcements from the continent and other Saxon kingdoms in Britain – ran roughshod over Lindsey. They did not bother to finish their siege but continued their march south.

Little word came from King Uther, and what word there was of him was the same – of an illness that would not abate, an illness which cast a shadow across the whole land and into its very soil. It was rumored that the king cried out for Merlin’s aid, only to have his wife turn into a viper at the mere mention of the magician. The nobles kept their realms together, but they knew that without the king to lead them, they would all end up the same as Lindsey.

The Saxons cared not for what afflicted the king or the people of Logres. They continued southward without mercy. No amount of plunder or blood could sate them. Octa and his forces had to be stopped or all was lost. That much was obvious. The question that haunted the nights of every lord, lady, and knight: could the soldiers of Logres defeat them?


Player Characters
Sir Aldwyn, Sir Annan, Sir Finnian, Sir Henry, Sir Keith, Sir Marcus, Sir Marcus Scipio

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XXIII. Cambrian hospitality was a deliberate, measured thing...
Wherein the knights deliver a letter and await word to carry back.

The Story So Far

Spring, 494

As went the king, so went the land. A general malaise fell upon Logres as the king lay ill, unseen by all save his closest advisors. Was this Merlin’s doing or had the king sent away the one man in all of Britain who could cure him? No one could say, but everyone knew that something had to change quickly. Octa was pillaging the Malahaut countryside, but he would not tarry there long. Lindsey and the north garrisoned against the inevitable moment.

By specific request, the knights of Sword Lake and their compatriots had been sent west into Cambria, there to treat with Sir Canan of Estregales and deliver a letter from King Uther. King Canan was the dominant political figure of the region. If an alliance with King Canan could be secured, then King Uther could have the stability and additional soldiery that he needed to meet King Octa head on.

The journey to this point has been uneventful. It started at Shrewton, where the knights did their best to comfort Lady Wynne. This was followed by a journey through Clarence and a visit in Gloucester with the venerable and plain-spoken Duke Gloucester. Leaving Logres brought them to Carlion, where they met with their former comrade Sir Alain and had dinner with King Nanteleod. Their meeting with Nanteleod was filled with candor, though instead of comforting them, it left them with questions. Why were they specifically chosen? What is in this letter that they are carrying? The knights had little time to ponder these things, for the next morning they were up early and continued their journey west.


Player Characters
Sir Aldwyn, Sir Annan, Sir Finnian, Sir Henry, Sir Keith, Sir Marcus, Sir Marcus Scipio

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XXII. As the Saxons moved south, King Uther cast about for allies...
Wherein the knights once again undertake diplomacy and intrigue in the king's name.

The Story So Far

Winter, 494

493 offered little to give hope. In Salisbury, family tragedies set the tone and naught that occurred after did little to lighten the gloom. The king sequestered himself from his own court and Queen Ygraine was even less seen. Octa and Eosa escaped and were easily able to make their way north to Nohaut. The embassy to Malahaut offered only scorn from the Centurion King and intrigues of a most troubling sort. Only the news of a heir to Salisbury, the young Robert, brought any joy.

The year ended with news of the Saxons moving south through Nohaut and into Lindsey. King Octa was coming for vengeance, for Logres, and for his axe. In order to fully confront the menace, peace with Logres’ neighbors must be establish. Alliances must be made. People look to the king, but he is nowhere to be seen and the land suffers.

These are dark times for Logres. Where the king falters, his knights must step up to deliver the land from the dangers which threaten it.


Player Characters
Sir Aldwyn, Sir Annan, Sir Finnian, Sir Henry, Sir Keith, Sir Marcus, Sir Marcus Scipio


Weekly Recap

Sir Dagonet’s Jest (Funniest Moment)

Paul – Gabe going the “Rosenkrantz & Guildenstern” route was both funny and helped set the tone.

Tom – The hijinx of the Knights Banneret of Gloucester, of course!

Incursion of the Fae (Eeriest Moment)

Paul – Again, apropos of Gabe’s comment, there was a lot of angst about their mission into the unknown as they set forth.

Tom – Sir Henry is becoming quite attached to Octa’s axe. One could say that it is becoming…precious to him.

Sir Dalan’s Charge (Best Heroics)

Paul – Sir Henry went right over the spot where his father died decades earlier.

Tom – Yet again Sir Keith and Sir Annan nobly bore the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, but it is likely only a matter of time until Silchester blood is spilled.

Hunting for Glatisant (Dubious Decision)

Paul – Given their track record, sending Sir Keith & Co. on an embassy doesn’t seem like a guarantee for success.

Tom – King Nanteleod’s comment about the messengers knowing not what message they carry pretty much sums up this category.

A Dream of Camelot (Best Roleplay Moment)

Paul – The interplay between the knights, particularly Sir Marcus, wondering about their choosing.

Tom – Sir Marcus Scipio’s sadness for losing Lady Indeg manifesting itself into some sort of projection onto his infant daughter has been interesting to see, and I’m intrigued as to where Gabe takes the character from here.

Wily in Wylie (Luck of the Irish Award)

Paul – The characters have so far not offended Welsh sensibilities, and this is a good thing.

Tom – Sir Aldwyn, for escaping the cesspool that is post-Roman London without the usual indignities.

Leap of the Macsuls (Luck of the Polish Award)

Paul – It’s Sir Finnian’s turn to enjoy London!

Tom – Alas! Partner of Wina, we hardly knew ye!

Honoring Those Who Honor Us (Pat on the Group Back)

Paul – Perfect attendance, as always, makes a difference.

Tom – Perfect attendance this session! Let’s make it a trend!



Family Legends

Sir Aldwyn
Many knights grow old, but few grow up. They take on squires, ride into battle, swear fealty to the lord of the moment and call that maturity. It’s what one takes away from those experiences that defines maturity.

Sir Annan
Annan is waiting.

Sir Finnian
Finnian wasn’t thrilled about going to a place where the Irish were frowned upon even more than Logres. Still, he took some cold comfort knowing that he would be hung or toasted by his association as a “knight who condemned Merlin” and not for his surname.

Sir Henry
Sir Henry thought the visit to the site of his father’s death to be a grueling, haunting, terrible experience that no person should have to endure. But it was no match for a brief trip to London.

Sir Keith
In a strange way the returned scrap of Diantha’s dress brought peace to Keith. Though he considered such thoughts sinful, he was better able to serve the Earl.

Sir Marcus
Sir Marcus wasn’t sure why anyone thought he was a good diplomat, but he did enjoy a good trip so went along with a shrug. They hadn’t died so far, which made the trip a success to date.

Sir Marcus Scipio
Marcus felt he had new insight into the mores of the elite, to wit: marrying the orphan of one’s late wife would be near scandalous. Marrying the widow of a man slain by one’s own violence — not so much.

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XXI. Merlin was nowhere to be found, nor was the king's unnamed heir...
Wherein uneasy peace gives way to grim tidings and ill portents.

The Story So Far

Spring, 493

The knights found themselves acquitted of treason, but still guilty in the eyes of Logres…not of kidnapping the king’s son, but of being responsible for the banishment of Merlin. In a strange twist of fate, Merlin’s exile left the realm ill at ease. It was his coming that heralded the end of the reign of evil Vortigern and Merlin’s name was attached to the greatest victories since Aurelius Ambrosius returned to Britain. Now he was gone and a collective sense of vulnerability set in like a damp chill in the winter.

The start of the year offered little to lift the gloom. An uneven season brought tragedy to Tisbury, where Sir Annan lost a son, and Baverstock, where Sir Henry lost both his beautiful wife and newborn daughter. In Stapleford, Sir Marcus the Roman gained a daughter but at the cost of her mother’s life. Lady Indeg, that fierce, powerful courtly force, had finally entertained one dalliance too many. The situation on the eastern border strained further when Sir Owain Creamer, whose marriage to Lady Grately was a source of tension, was felled by a “hunter’s arrow” during a hunt.

In the absence of Merlin, it now falls on King Uther and his other advisors to secure continued peace and strength for Logres. Pentecost Court that year would be in Silchester, realm of the king’s most powerful advisor, Duke Ulfius. From there, orders would be given and the direction of Logres charted.


Player Characters
Sir Aldwyn, Sir Annan, Sir Finnian, Sir Henry, Sir Keith, Sir Marcus


Weekly Recap

Sir Dagonet’s Jest (Funniest Moment)

Paul – Sitting there for a while wondering where the hell Gabe was and then remembering that he told us last week that he wasn’t going to be there tonight. Whoops.

Zach – Tom’s “Do you even intrigue?” comment.

Incursion of the Fae (Eeriest Moment)

Paul – Sir Keith mentioning to the group that there were three Saxon envoys that he saw, and then when they looked over, only two were to be seen.

Zach – Realizing that we were about to be ambushed by the saxons.

Sir Dalan’s Charge (Best Heroics)

Paul – Sir Keith picking his fingernails with his dagger as Sir Blains attempted to needle Earl Roderick.

Zach – Sir Henry deciding not to go plant his axe inside the saxon diplomats’ skulls.

Hunting for Glatisant (Dubious Decision)

Paul – Earl Roderick was perhaps unwise to bring Eisenhelvi north with him to Nohaut’s neighbor.

Zach – Agree. Einsenhelvi probably shouldn’t have made its way so far north, unless the plan was to draw out the saxons.

A Dream of Camelot (Best Roleplay Moment)

Paul – Sir Annan shared an unexpected moment with King Uther that I quite enjoyed.

Zach – Perhaps Sir Marcus Broderig is maturing? Less whoring, drinking, and debauching, more apple bobbing and activities that can be spoken of in decent company?

Wily in Wylie (Luck of the Irish Award)

Paul – Not many knights can claim fame to being excellent at apple bobbing contests, but the Little Giant can.

Zach – Sir Henry didn’t have another daughter this year…

Leap of the Macsuls (Luck of the Polish Award)

Paul – The Macsuls join the Ciociolas in morning the death of their matriarch. Lady Gladys (and daughter), RIP.

Zach – …because Lady Gladys died during childbirth.

Honoring Those Who Honor Us (Pat on the Group Back)

Paul – It was good having Bill back. There’s always a “next level” dynamic to all the interplay when Finnian is actually present. Plus, I’m liking how the subtle changes are playing out in the seating arrangements and will continue to tweak that as characters come and go.

Zach – I think everyone did a great job with the court (as always) as well as handling the saxon diplomat situation.


Family Legends

Sir Aldwyn
Once again our formations face northwards for lord, for king and for God. So it has been for all the days of my generation, but we must not be the first to grow weary. We have sacrificed too much for any of it to have been in vain.

Sir Annan
Pedivere once told me, “If you wish to see the health of an empire, look closely at those who advise it”. Observing Pelinore and Uther and their lands, I think you need not look so far.

Sir Finnian
A foul wind blew all year. Saxon lords that should be dead escaped their confinement to raise their battle standards again. Wives and children died. In struggling to hold his head above the muck, the Centurion King latches on to the very vermin that pushed him down into the mud in the first place. But in the midst of these disgusting events, Finnian saw an oath upheld and a sword reforged. By the might and mercy of god, that which breaks can be reforged.

Sir Henry
Sir Henry’s grief from the loss of his wife and child was channeled into his rage towards the Saxons. Somehow, he staid his hand when in the presence of the Saxon diplomats, but unleashed his rage during the ambush in the woods.

Sir Keith
So Keith was sent to Eburacum a second time to win the pledge of the Centurion King. And a second time he failed.

Sir Marcus
Things seem to be going from bad to worse. First, we are accused of treason and then Octa escapes. The Saxons are reinvigorated and war is upon us again with an ally whose loyalty is questionable. All we can do is fight and hope for better days!

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XX. Cries of "Traitors!" greeted the knights as they arrived at Tintagel...
Wherein the knights defend their honor and lives in a trial before the king.

The Story So Far

Spring, 492

491 ended in a daze, an unhappy dream that no one could wake up from. Even Sir Henry found himself shook up simply at the gaze of a young girl, when Queen Ygraine’s daughter Morgan stared at him with curious intent. Far from home, away from their families, the knights did their duty in a strange, unwelcoming land.

The arrival of Merlin was greeting with some excitement, as the last time brought them great glory and adventure. Yet in the space of a few hours, their lives took a severe turn for the worse. Merlin left them waiting deep in the forest and when he return, he bade them distract his pursuers. Those pursuers turned out to be the king’s own men, and the confusion proved enough for Merlin to escape.

Sir Brastias swore that this would not be the end of it, and he was a man of his word. The call came from Tintagel to report there to answer charges of treason. The knights ride forth with heavy hearts and uncertain feelings to face their accusers.


Player Characters
Sir Aldwyn, Sir Annan, Sir Finnian, Sir Henry, Sir Keith, Sir Marcus, Sir Marcus Scipio


Weekly Recap

Sir Dagonet’s Jest (Funniest Moment)

Paul – Partway into our twentieth session, Gabe realizes that it is assigned seating at the table.

Bryant -rolling for events with gabe gaining a daughter and shortly thereafter losing a wife.

Incursion of the Fae (Eeriest Moment)

Paul – The disconcerting visit by The Waterman.

Bryant – Awaiting the judgement.

Sir Dalan’s Charge (Best Heroics)

Paul – Earl Roderick stood in public opposition to the king for you. I hope you appreciate it.

Bryant – And our mentor as well for believing our innocence.

Hunting for Glatisant (Dubious Decision)

Paul – Sir Marcus Scipio was given a “Get Out of Jail Free” card and used it whilst his brothers remained under threat of death.

Bryant – Indeed.

A Dream of Camelot (Best Roleplay Moment)

Paul – Each of the speeches given by the knights, appropriate to the skill/trait/passion they chose to roll on.

Bryant – I have to agree.

Wily in Wylie (Luck of the Irish Award)

Paul – Lady Indeg’s premature death shitcans a number of devious plot developments that I had in the works.

Bryant – The group for getting acquitted.

Leap of the Macsuls (Luck of the Polish Award)

Paul – First the knights are falsely accused and then when they are acquitted, all of a sudden people blame them for Merlin’s exile.

Bryant – Me for saving my courtesy rolls then when I decide to get married fail my roll.

Honoring Those Who Honor Us (Pat on the Group Back)

Paul – The accused knights did a good job of pushing the conversation without much prodding with me. There was a lot to discuss, and they did so in conflict with their own passions and each other. Good stuff.

Bryant – definitely the discussions we had pretrial


Family Legends

Sir Aldwyn
The knights who condemned Merlin? Ridiculous! If anyone has been bewitched, it’s our good king, and I shudder to think that perhaps none but Merlin can set things right.

Sir Annan
Justice comes at a high price. One that only Romans can pay.

Sir Finnian
Finnian could only shrug when asked about his role in Merlin’s machinations. “Apparently I was possessed,” said he. “I didn’t feel possessed, but then I’ve never been possessed so wouldn’t really even know what to look for. The point is that I was found innocent and live to fight another day. Luck o’ the Irish wins again.”

Sir Henry
The pagan Henry was prepared to denounce his own defense until a niggling doubt settled into his mind: there was so much magic in him that how could he be sure what was his free will and what was compulsion? That minute doubt stayed his voice and, for it, stayed the executioner’s hand.

Sir Keith
And thus were the knights of Salisbury used to advance the cause of the enemy.

Sir Marcus
Sir Marcus was relieved he and his friends were free and cleared of all charges. He knew the pain the king was going through, but there was still more behind the abduction of the Prince. Time would only tell.

Sir Marcus Scipio
Oh Blake my Blake my little Blake. How he wails. He knows he has lost his most fearsome defender. I in armor, mounted, with sword and shield at hand, am but a meagre substitute. Yea, I got my wish that my children would know their father, but forgot to wish for the mother, too. The gods make every wish a cruel jape.

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XIX. The dead were buried, but their legacies remained...
Wherein our heroes find no comfort in new surroundings and circumstances.

The Story So Far

Autumn, 491

The Duke of Cornwall is slain. His wife is remarried to the King. Prince Madoc has been buried with honors at Stonehenge.

For all the changes that have rocked Logres, though, nothing has penetrated the numb shock that struck closer to home. Sir Kendrick and Sir Pedivere have died, killed in the Battle of Terrabil. Sir Keith was almost killed by Sir Jaradan in a duel shrouded in mystery. Just a year ago, all was triumph and optimism. It all seems a distant dream now and not even happy events, like the wedding of Sir Marcus the Roman to the widow Indeg, can bring any joy.

And now the knights find themselves garrisoned at Terrabil, there to solidify the king’s iron grip over his formerly rebellious duchy. Winter has yet to arrive, yet those who live are chilled to the bone with premonition and worry. With their friends gone, knightly duty falls more heavily upon the survivors’ shoulders.


Player Characters
Sir Annan, Sir Finnian, Sir Henry, Sir Keith, Sir Marcus, Sir Marcus Scipio


Weekly Recap

Sir Dagonet’s Jest (Funniest Moment)

Paul – The image of Sir Marcus Scipio snarfing all over King Uther courtesy of a botched courtesy roll is too funny to resist.

Jeff – I prefer the Lady Indeg’s precipitous exit from the said event.

Incursion of the Fae (Eeriest Moment)

Paul – Merlin leaving the knights lost in the forest and their realization that they had stumbled into a life or death situation courtesy of another encounter with the magician.

Jeff – The slow realization that the once united group is beginning to crack in response to the varied fortunes of the group. Not everyone seems to regard Sir Keith’s elevation as highly as he.

Sir Dalan’s Charge (Best Heroics)

Paul – The knights aided Merlin in his quest!

Jeff – Standing firm(ish) against superior knights in the cause of a higher (?) good.

Hunting for Glatisant (Dubious Decision)

Paul – The knights aided Merlin in his quest!

Jeff – Knowingly holding off the King’s men once informed that Merlin had absconded with the heir.

A Dream of Camelot (Best Roleplay Moment)

Paul – The group hashing out their situation after Sir Brastias’ revelation of Merlin’s actions and their perceived culpability in it.

Jeff – The scene immediately prior when the wisdom of awaiting a wizard was discussed

Wily in Wylie (Luck of the Irish Award)

Paul – Sir Finnian and Sir Aldwyn for being absent and avoiding the treason charges.

Jeff – Following Merlin into the woods and NOT meeting the jabberwcky.

Leap of the Macsuls (Luck of the Polish Award)

Paul – Sir Annan shows up to carry on his brother’s work only to fall victim to his brother’s second-greatest lamentation: his group’s affiliation with pagan magic.

Jeff – The absolutely chance meeting of Merlin in the woods.

Honoring Those Who Honor Us (Pat on the Group Back)

Paul – A low-key session with some great character work. Interesting to watch Jeff find a feel for his new character and Zach wrap his head back around Henry.

Jeff – Heirs for everybody! Now, we just need some characters to live long enough to hand their manors over tot heir children.


Family Legends

Sir Annan
Will Merlin’s antics never stop agonizing the Fourniers?

Sir Finnian
Finnian had always regretted missing out on the Adventure of Sword Lake. When Merlin first appeared, Sir Finnian thought it would be his chance to make up for last time. Now he’s wondering if maybe he was the lucky one six year ago.

Sir Henry
Sir Henry was so grateful to Merlin for returning his life, he didn’t care whether or not Merlin was guilty. Honor demanded that Henry stand up for Merlin no matter what.

Sir Keith
Keith found himself longing for what he considered his birthright: to disappear without a trace like his ancestors before him.

Sir Marcus
We stand accused of treason. Aiding the wizard always seems to land us in a situation. Now, with Merlin apparently kidnapping the Prince, we are left to suffer the consequences. Who knows what goes on in the mind of the wizard. One thing is certain: we are in TROUBLE!

Sir Marcus Scipio
Dearest Indeg —

I have faith in the King’s justice, an faith in Merlin’s loyalty, but whatever happens, you know my love for you and our little Blake is eternal. The time may come when my dear mother may not be there to raise my new, youngest brother, Hadrian, and I ask that, even in my absence, you bring him up with Blake, treating him as your own, if indeed that time should come.

Until our happy reunion,
with devotion,
— Marcus

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XVIII. The future has taken root in the past...
Wherein history and legend intersect in cataclysmic fashion...

The Story So Far

Summer, 491

Duke Gorlois’ flight from Christmas Court the previous year left King Uther in a state of blinding rage. When spring rolled around, he was adamant – he would see the Duke dead once and for all for his disloyalty. Only the quietest, most secret whispers spoke of the king’s other possible reason for wanting the duke out of the way.

News of yet more Saxons, this time in the south, cause Earl Roderick to leave his foot soldiers in Salisbury. Lady Diantha’s second disappearance keeps Sir Keith in Cholderton for the second year running. His comrades, along with the vast majority of the Salisbury knights, ride west the Earl and King Uther – west toward Cornwall.

Surprisingly, the Duke does not take the field against them. He retreats with most of his force into Castle Terrabil, while his wife, children, and treasury are hidden away in his capital at Tintagel. Uther rides west with a 1/4 of his force. With him go Sir Henry and Sir Marcus the Little Giant, the latter eager for another glimpse of the Lady Ygraine. The remaining knights remain in the siege of Terrabil under the command of Duke Ulfius and Prince Madoc. It is there that Merlin first reappears after many months…


Player Characters
Sir Finnian, Sir Henry, Sir Keith, Sir Kendrick, Sir Marcus, Sir Marcus Scipio, Sir Pedivere


Weekly Recap

Sir Dagonet’s Jest (Funniest Moment)

Paul – Sir Marcus Scipio’s reaction to something his wife said to him.

Gabe – Not to lapse into self-flattery, but we had a good laugh over our next assignment being Castle Really Horrible.

Incursion of the Fae (Eeriest Moment)

Paul – In the space of about three minutes realtime, we lost two characters, another one went unconscious, and all of a sudden Sir Finnian found himself facing an enraged Sir Gorlois alone.

Gabe – Madoc’s grisly death, being cleaved asunder by Gorlois’s sword – shocking because it was so unexpected.

Sir Dalan’s Charge (Best Heroics)

Paul – Rushing to the prince’s defense – gallant, foolish, valorous – was a fitting final heroic act for Pedivere and Kendrick. Sir Finnian and Sir Marcus the Roman deserve credit, as well.

Gabe – Julian, Sir Marcus Scipio’s unflappable war horse, brings high distinction to his breed once more.

Armor? Nay! Battle? Yay! (Dubious Decision)

Paul – The book actually contains this passage: “If they wish, however, they can run away and fight without armor. There’s a good chance they will be killed or badly wounded, but sometimes people need a lesson on just how useful armor really is.” I dismissed it, thinking that lesson well-learned already, but apparently not.

Gabe – It was perhaps a mistake to passively wait for developments outside Gorlois’s castle for days without trying to put up field fortifications, illumination, or a sentry system.

A Dream of Camelot (Best Roleplay Moment)

Paul – The eulogies for the fallen knights, all of them good, but my personal favorite was Keith’s for Sir Pedivere.

Gabe – Sir Kieth was convincing as grievously wounded in the aftermath of the duel.

Wily in Wylie (Luck of the Irish Award)

Paul – Sir Keith should have been the third player character to die that night, but survived through an amazing series of lucky combat and passion rolls. Sir Finnian likewise should have died, but improbably held off Gorlois long enough for other knights to finish the job.

Gabe – Sir Marcus Scipio, for marrying the lovely Lady Indeg, who is perfect in every way and has no flaws about which any husband could ever have any complaints at all, ever.

Leap of the Macsuls (Luck of the Polish Award)

Paul – Sir Kendrick will never make that trip to London now and Sir Pedivere died in the defense of the man he hated most in the world.

Gabe – Deceptive/Honest rolls working at cross-purposes as Marcus and Marcus Scipio try to conceal Sir Kieth’s participation in a duel during the King’s wedding celebrations.

Honoring Those Who Honor Us (Pat on the Group Back)

Paul – An emotionally draining session that saw two characters depart forever. Just as a nod to the amazing ways a tabletop game can take you to unexpected places: it was both ironic and poignant that Pedivere died as he did – rushing to Madoc’s defense, having fumbled his Hate (Madoc) roll and giving himself over to his duty as a knight instead of his hatred as a man. It brought Pedivere’s fumbled intrigue roll from 486 full-circle, telling an amazing and tragic tale of two men never meant to occupy the main stage of our story.

Gabe – Good recovery from a sudden and unforeseen loss — speaks well of morale — Tom was especially swift and diligent in generating a new character and getting him into play before the session was wrapped.


Family Legends

Sir Finnian
After somehow surviving extended combat against Duke Gorlois, Sir Finnian was too busy feeling lucky to wonder when his Irishman’s luck was going to run out. He was a natural gambler so when his thoughts turned too morose, he just looked for the next roll of the dice. When he finally lost his last roll, Finnian hoped his end would be as swift as Pedivere and Kendrick’s.

Sir Henry
Sir Henry soothed the pain caused by his companions’ shocking deaths with a trip to the forest to continue his hunt for Glatisant.

Sir Keith
The year 491 found Keith questioning his faith in his fellow knights, in King Uther, and in the Lord. Just two years prior, he had been celebrating great personal success and spectacular victories for the realm. When had God abandoned him?

Keith regretted formulating a prideful concept in his mind, that he had achieved all he’d set out to in life. He was a knight who had led his forces to victory, he had married above his station, he had produced an heir, and he had strengthened Cholderton. He had everything he’d desired, but it seemed it was not to last.

Sir Kendrick
Always a man of God, Sir Kendrick was ready to meet his Maker. Whether his Maker was prepared for the great ordeal of meeting Sir Kendrick was another matter altogether.

Sir Marcus
Pedivere and Kendrick dead…the king’s own son and the duke, as well. Two friends lost all for the king’s obsession over a woman. After what I witnessed, there can be no doubt that sorcery was involved in both ends. Magic has a price, a lesson that I hope the king has learned. As knights, all we can do is soldier on and hope our liege can return to his senses.

Sir Marcus Scipio
This is a time of uneven fortunes. The King loses a son and gains a wife. I lose two friends and gain a wife. Sorrow moves with joy like shadow moves with light. Where can we seek constancy in such a fickle world? Only in our cause; only in the cause of the realm: let it be defended, united, and brought to a state of prosperity in our time.

Sir Pedivere
The rest is silence.

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XVII. Christmas Court that year was anything but merry...
Wherein duty weighs more heavily and desire burns more strongly.

The Story So Far

Winter, 490

The knights traveled that year to London for Christmas Court. For all, it was their first time to that metropolis as knights. For others, it was simply their first time ever. They each traveled to London for duty, but also lost in their own thoughts…

…and worries. Despite the miraculous victory over the Saxons and the return of Sir Henry, something troubling nestled in their hearts but would not name itself. The strange and tragic tale of Praetor Syagrius stayed with them, as did the damage his visit wrought on some of their homes. The sudden coming to blows between Sir Finnian and Sir Kendrick was never far from anyone’s mind, least of all theirs. Then there were the quiet, individual twists of fate, unspoken even amongst friends.

By all accounts, the King’s Court seems to mirror this. Rumors of discontent and fractiousness reach Salisbury even before they leave for London. Merlin has not been seen in the king’s company for some time, and it is suggested that he is off resting again. Now comes word that Nineve, the Lady of the Lake, travels in Duchess Ygraine’s company. Instead of a festive feeling, there is a tremendous sense of foreboding…


Player Characters
Sir Henry, Sir Keith, Sir Marcus, Sir Marcus Scipio, Sir Pedivere


Weekly Recap

Sir Dagonet’s Jest (Funniest Moment)

Paul – Oh, so many to choose from, but GM’s choice will have to be the knights’ juvenile misbehavior ruining Sir Marcus Scipio’s culminating romance with the Lady Indeg.

Jon – GM: You realize you’re getting laid tonight.
Marcus Scipio (all excited): No way!
Gabe then rolls a 1 on his chaste roll to not bed Lady Indeg.

Incursion of the Fae (Eeriest Moment)

Paul – The disappearance of Lady Diantha (again), and how Sir Pedivere and Sir Keith almost came to blows over it.

Jon – The mysterious flight of the Cornish in an unnatural snowstorm.

Sir Dalan’s Charge (Best Heroics)

Paul – Sir Marcus Scipio fought heroically to not fight Sir Keith over the latter’s cheerleading of his friends’ misbehavior while Sir Marcus Scipio was trying to court Indeg.

Jon – Likewise Sir Keith for not spilling Pedivere’s blood after the quip about Keith not being able to take care of his family.

Hunting for Glatisant (Dubious Decision)

Paul – Sir Keith electing to not follow the king and the sword.

Jon – Marcus Little Giant trying to make a snow throne to watch the duel from.

A Dream of Camelot (Best Roleplay Moment)

Paul – Again, many to choose from. Sir Pedivere and Sir Keith’s angry exchanges through the night were the most charged and compelling.

Jon – Marcus Scipio’s outrage at his friends for ruining his chances with Indeg.

Wily in Wylie (Luck of the Irish Award)

Paul – No one was particularly lucky this session. In fact, the phrase “coming down the mountain like an avalanche” springs to mind.

Jon – Marcus Scipio. He doesn’t know it, but he was saved from the vile Indeg.

Leap of the Macsuls (Luck of the Polish Award)

Paul – Sir Keith, for reasons known (his sister, his indiscretion regarding Indeg) and unknown. If that sounds ominous, it should.

Jon – Sir Marcus for daring to woo in the presence of his peers.

Honoring Those Who Honor Us (Pat on the Group Back)

Paul – A bit of an odd-duck session. Lots of fucking about that I normally would put the stamp on, yet it all fit in well with where things are. It was nice to see Sir Henry back in the saddle.

Jon – I am enjoying the tension and player conflict. It was good all around.


Family Legends

Sir Finnian
Finnian couldn’t believe King Uther could throw away his victory so easily until he observed his friends’ antics. He then decided that a little good fortune must make everyone too punch-drunk for their own good.

Sir Henry
While Sir Henry’s ultimate fight might have been in question, his hatred of the Saxons never died. With his recovery, the hatred and thirst for Saxon blood found a renewed vigor.

Sir Keith
Sadly, the knights parted ways after harsh words and no reconciliation. Not all were given the chance to make amends in this world.

Sir Marcus
Sir Marcus was concerned for the king. The kingdom was finally being unified and an obsession for a woman was blinding the king. Sir Marcus could relate – Lady Ygraine was a prize, but at what cost? Sir Marcus volunteered to ride with the king if just to see the lady once more but also perhaps to save the king.

Sir Marcus Scipio
God’s design is in everything. I am eager to make Lady Indeg a wife, but not to make her a widow. The interruptions of our courtship may be a well-concealed blessing. Death hangs in the air here, and my luck has been heavily taxed already…

Sir Pedivere
P.I.P.

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XVI. Not since the days of Constantin had there been such opportunity...
Wherein Logres is united and the chance for greatness is within the realm's grasp.

The Story So Far

Late Spring, 490

Octa is grievously wounded. Eosa sits sullenly in a dungeon, bound in chains. The Saxon foe is routed at minimal expense to Logres. Neighboring kingdoms remain peaceable. The Saxon kingdoms stir in restlessness and worry. Not since the days of High King Constantin has Logres faced such an opportunity to secure its borders and to drive the Saxon foe from the realm.

Though the Salisbury knights bear great injuries, their own circumstance mirrors the host – they suffered no deaths in their already legendary role in the battle. It was by their efforts that King Octa and his magic axe were taken. Now King Pellinore of Gomoret has the axe and all wait with baited breath to see how that situation between he and Uther resolves itself.

Now, all of Lincoln is being turned into one large festival. Every corner of the castle and surrounding area is being used to hold the victory party! The night’s celebration promises to turn into a new dawn for Logres.


Player Characters
Sir Finnian, Sir Gildas, Sir Keith, Sir Kendrick, Sir Marcus, Sir Marcus Scipio, Sir Pedivere


Weekly Recap

Sir Dagonet’s Jest (Funniest Moment)

Paul – Gabe had a fine “Jack tribute moment” where he heartily volunteered…but then asked what it was he was volunteering for because he forgot.

Bill – Contemplating Sir Keith’s surprise on seeing us all alive and having to explain all of the Keithlandian banners that had popped up over all our manors.

Incursion of the Fae (Eeriest Moment)

Paul – The awakening of Sir Henry.

Bill – The screaming mists were very unsettling.

Sir Dalan’s Charge (Best Heroics)

Paul – The knights of the oath holding their ground throughout the ceremony.

Bill – All of the knights standing fast through the choking, screaming fog to witness the return of Sir Henry.

Hunting for Glatisant (Dubious Decision)

Paul – Sir Keith had a lusty moment that may come back to haunt him, though like many such passion-driven moments, the decision was made for him.

Bill – It is quite literal this time. Sir Henry’s decision to hunt Glatisant over spending even one night with his wife is sure to come back and bite him.

A Dream of Camelot (Best Roleplay Moment)

Paul – Sir Marcus Scipio taking the lead in welcoming Sir Henry back was a nice moment.

Bill – Sir Marcus Scipio’s quiet but very noticeable struggle to make sense of Syagrius’s betrayal and downfall. But after a day of thought, it came to rest in the sad realization that the once proud warrior attacked Salisbury as a bitter act of self destruction.

Wily in Wylie (Luck of the Irish Award)

Paul – Shrewton! Like Coriolanus’ wife and mother, Lady Vela and Lady Wynne calmed the heart of the savage beast.

Bill – Sir Keith may have missed the great battle this year, but his defense of Salisbury will ensure his name does not go unmentioned when this summer is recounted in years to come.

Leap of the Macsuls (Luck of the Polish Award)

Paul – Syagrius was abandoned by Madoc and in the end by his friend Sir Marcus Scipio, who passed on an opportunity to speak on his kinsman’s behalf.

Bill – Syagrius had not a friend to turn to in Salsbury.

Honoring Those Who Honor Us (Pat on the Group Back)

Paul – A nice session where the hope and optimism of all was fatefully tempered by the passions of individuals.

Bill – That was an impressive session. It was a lot of fun watching all the personalities clash (Finnian vs Kendrick, Keith vs Pedivere, Marcus vs the Christian knights) but still clearly regard each other as brothers.


Family Legends

Sir Finnian
See that burned down barn over there. Aye, we could tear it down and build a new one, but let it rest. Syagrius burnt it down and killed two of our men in the process. Who the hell is Syagrius? I don’t rightly know nor do I care to. But that barn will help you remember you’ve got more enemies than even you know that will take your land and your life.

Sir Gildas
The relief Sir Gildas felt when he saw Sir Henry recovery was only matched by his fear and confusion upon seeing the speed at which Sir Henry’s strength returned.

Sir Keith
One did not have to traverse Logres to find battles to fight. Perhaps the battles at home had consequences even more dire than those the King waged.

Sir Kendrick
Not only is Sir Henry back, but he has awoken into an age where Duke Ulfius and Earl Roderick can share a joke and a toast and in which the Saxons have been brought low. We have all awoken to a better time.

Sir Marcus
Sir Marcus went home richer in plunder, but poorer in spirit. Hehad no marriage prospects and a restless unease over the course of his life going forward.

Sir Marcus Scipio
That axe could do for another stricken man what it did for Sir Henry. What if the comrades of another fallen warrior try to take it away from us, for the same reasons we took it from King Octa?

Sir Pedivere
Pedivere scratched his chin and furtively contemplated these events.

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XV. Sword against axe, with Logres and a friend's life the stakes...
Wherein all of Uther's efforts have led to this moment.

The Story So Far

Late Spring, 490

Late winter’s ill-tidings for Sir Marcus have set the tone for Pentecost Court this year. A general grimness rules over all for the battle soon to be fought. If King Uther wins, then the realm has a chance to be at peace in a way that it has not since the halcyon days of King Constantin. If he loses, then slaughter and slavery will most likely be the fate of all.

There is hope in that King Uther marches with a united Logres at his back. Surely that will make a difference! That’s what people said to themselves and each other, and all made a good attempt to believe the words when heard. Whatever people believed would soon not matter.

It would all be decided soon enough. The kingdom stands at an unprecedented moment. Peace or perdition. As an unprecedented array of nobility gathered for that year’s Pentecost Court, there was cautious optimism that victory and better days were at hand.


Player Characters
Sir Finnian, Sir Gildas, Sir Keith, Sir Kendrick, Sir Marcus, Sir Marcus Scipio, Sir Pedivere


Weekly Recap

Sir Dagonet’s Jest (Funniest Moment)

Paul – Sir Keith bidding the knights adieu, and then Jon sliding down to Bryant’s usual spot so that he could play Sir Marcus.

Zach – Sir Marcus Scipio’s Mr. Magoo-esque (mostly) successful fumbling through the first few stages of battle.

Incursion of the Fae (Eeriest Moment)

Paul – When Sir Marcus Scipio asked Sir Keith what he knew about the axe, and Sir Keith realized that everyone else knew something about it except him.

Zach – Knowing that the axe was so close but still separated by hordes of enemies.

Sir Dalan’s Charge (Best Heroics)

Paul – Sir Marcus Scipio was roused from his unconscious/near death state and unflinchingly rode forth into the final combat (and doled out the first death, no less).

Zach – Sir Marcus Scipio for his glorious turnaround in battle.

Hunting for Glatisant (Dubious Decision)

Paul – Sir Gildas willingly dismounted at one point, I think?

Zach – Sir Keith’s decision not to ride into battle, therefore forfeiting phat loot and mad glory.

A Dream of Camelot (Best Roleplay Moment)

Paul – The giving of last requests to Sir Keith before he left. Also, Finnian’s gesture to exchange his sword for Keith’s so that Keith’s could also be bloodied in the battle was supremely badass.

Zach – When everyone obeyed Sir Pedivere’s request to fight 1 on 1 (and the subsequent move to help him out).

Wily in Wylie (Luck of the Irish Award)

Paul – I wanted to rename this category “Rescuing Sir Pedivere” because not only did Finnian make his horsemanship roll to do so, he then took a crit hit and lived. Of course, I realized “Wily in Wylie” still fit! All of you are lucky, but Pedivere and Finnian most of all.

Zach – Definitely Pedivere and Finnian. So close to death!

Leap of the Macsuls (Luck of the Polish Award)

Paul – The berserkers who it turns out have been playing nerf for the first five years of the campaign. Poor, innocent berserkers.

Zach – Paul, who didn’t get to kill as many of us as he’d hoped to.

Honoring Those Who Honor Us (Pat on the Group Back)

Paul – The Emperor’s comment at the beginning of this clip generally reflects my feelings:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=6FjIjUJ6RtQ#t=17s

Zach – Good dice rolls, everyone!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zehPrAIFtyM


Family Legends

Sir Finnian
Finnian Mullally fought well against the hordes of Saxons in the Battle of Lindsey. None can deny that. He and his fellow knights drove into the heart of the Saxon army and brought down many a beserker and Saxon axeman. They were as wheat before the sickle blade. Sir Finnian knew the strength of his own arm and the glory of the blade he bore, for it was not his own but that of the valiant Sir Keith. Though he would serve his lord and his king on the battlefield, the noble Sir Keith was left to protect the steadings of Salisbury. This task had often been one the Mullally clan proudly took. Never let it be said that Sir Finnian abandoned that tradition. Never let it be said that Sir Keith had no part in the battle. For Sir Finnian took Sir Keith’s blade in exchange for his own, so that it be known a Mullally blade protected its home and a Creamer blade brought death and despair to the enemy. For lo, were not the lands of the Mullallys and the Creamers safe in their guardianship? And did not the blade of Sir Keith find its way into the very guts of the Saxon Lord Octa?

Sir Gildas
Sir Gildas was relieved to complete Merlin’s quest…but would it actually work?

Sir Keith
Staying home to guard Salisbury while the rest of the group participated in the Battle of Lindsey further separated Keith from his peers.

Sir Kendrick
Though Sir Kendrick and King Octa tasted each other’s steel that day, by divine providence, both would leave the field of battle alive. However, the Saxon king would do so in chains and without his axe, which was bound for Baverstock. Victory was too humble a word to define the events at Lindsey, and Sir Kendrick could never find the words to describe how he felt.

Sir Marcus
Sir Marcus wasn’t able to save his daughter’s life, but if he could get Octa’s axe to where it needed to go, he might just save his friend’s. It was his sole comfort.

Sir Marcus Scipio
“I may not have been the right man to win the enchanted axe, Merlin, but I damn well brought the right horse!”

Sir Pedivere
It’s not a battle if you’re standing at the end….

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